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Thread: wiring diagram for lightning arrestors

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    3

    Question wiring diagram for lightning arrestors

    Can someone offer advice as to how to wire a lighting arrestor to protect a well. I have a delta lighting arrestor and it is unclear how to make the connections. the instructions say "connect to the breaker". The lightning arrestor has 2 black wires, a single white and a green. Does this mean I should double lug the blacks under the same breaker that goes out to the well? If this is the case, I am confused as to how wiring the arrestor in parallel wil protect the surge from damaging my panelboard.

    Any advice would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Iowegia
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    16,906
    Here's an image that may help:


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    14

    Thumbs up

    Try this link, its from their website !

    http://www.deltala.com/installa.htm

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    3

    Question Double lugged under the breaker and wired in parallel it is!

    Thanks guys.
    For some reason I thought that they would actually create a break in the line but I guess not. I guess the question is, how do you know if they are actually still furnctioning. A colleague told me you smell them after a lightning storm. Anyone have any better ideas? wire in a LED? test with a meter for continuity?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Litchfield, CT
    Posts
    8,622
    Quote Originally Posted by solarchris
    A colleague told me you smell them after a lightning storm.

    Did he tell you what it should smell like if it was bad?
    "Electricity is actually made up of extremely tiny particles called electrons, that you cannot see with the naked eye unless you have been drinking."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    7,294
    Most surge protection devices today have indicators of some kind (LED, site glass, ect.). Those that do not simply need to be monitored for signs of damage or other ill effects from the surge currents. Smell would be one possible indicator of "fried" circuitry.

    Obviously, if the structure / service is struck by a lightning strike, the device should be replaced regardless if it shows any sign of taking the hit.
    Bryan P. Holland, MCP

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