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Thread: Stress cones

  1. #1
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    Question Stress cones

    Why are they required?

  2. #2
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    what are they?
    "Electricity is actually made up of extremely tiny particles called electrons, that you cannot see with the naked eye unless you have been drinking."

  3. #3
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    For stress relief. Limits the potential difference over a gradient. Keeps the cable insulation in tact at the terminal end.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by mdshunk
    For stress relief.
    That's what I don't get. Where does this "stress" come from? What causes it?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by stickboy1375
    what are they?
    They are those pointy things you see on the end of underground high/medium voltage cable where it gets terminated to overhead lines.

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    Quote Originally Posted by peter d
    That's what I don't get. Where does this "stress" come from? What causes it?
    Just think of it like a plumbing "reducer" fitting. You have electrical energy coming down the pipe (wire) and if you just cut off the insulation, it will tend to blast right out the end. You need a stress cone to bring it to a subtle stop. Consider that the first layer of the insulation on the high voltage cable is semiconducting, so you need fitting on the end (the stress cone) that mimmics the conductor's insulation. Layer of semi-con, and a layer of dielectric. If the high voltage cable was just insulated with dielectric, that would have to be some pretty darned good insulation. They layer it first with semicon to limit the amount of actual energy that the outer insulation is exposed to. Same goes for the terminal end, thus you use a stress cone. It keeps the shield sufficiently far away from the conductor. The high voltage guys might have some other stuff to add, but that's about it in a simple nutshell.
    Last edited by mdshunk; 09-29-07 at 09:00 PM.

  7. #7
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    It is pretty much semantics but you rarely see real "Stress Cones" any more. Stress cones are a form of geometric stress control. They get their name from their appearance. It is tape built up in the shape of a cone. The kits you see all over these days are forms of capacitive stress control. There is a material built in the kit that when installed is placed at the end of the shield cut back. It has a very high dielectric constant that capacitively changes the voltage distribution around the shield termination. By changing the electrical field surrounding the termination, the stress concentration is reduced from several hundred volts per mil to less than 50 volts per mil.

    mdshunk,
    The semi con layer that is in contact with the conductor is known as a strand shield. Its purpose is to eliminate voltage stress in voids between the conductor and the insulation. Since the potential on the conductor strand will differ from the potential on the insulation at the points between the strands there will be a voltage stress across the air gap. This can cause ionization of the air between the conductor strands resulting in insulation failure. The strand shield has the same potential as the conductor so there is no voltage stress across the air pockets.

  8. #8
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    Thanks Nick

    not many here have hand wrapped or even seen a true stress cone for that matter. You tell a kid today to take down those potheads they would probubly tackle the long haired kid on the masons crew.

  9. #9
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    pictures of a pot head

    Last edited by 72.5kv; 09-30-07 at 11:21 AM.

  10. #10
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    Thumbs up

    Thanks for the info. Once again, I'm amazed at the amount of knowledge available here.

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