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Pool Shell Bonding, Conductive and Nonconductive Shells

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    #16
    Originally posted by Lmeagles36 View Post
    Understood, but to answer my question: does the structural steel have to be bonded if there is a vinyl liner over it because in one section the NEC says it does not since vinyl liners are nonconductive. Then in another section the NEC says are structural steel needs to be bonded no matter what. That's why I mentioned conflicting sections. It can be argued both ways depending on which NEC referenced section you want to use.

    Did this not answer it?
    [COLOR=#333333]except the rebar in a vinyl liner.[/COLOR]
    IOW-- no I don't believe the rebar needs bonding with a vinyl liner over it. I would probably do it anyway in case someone decided to change from a vinyl to concrete pool
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky

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      #17
      Originally posted by Lmeagles36 View Post
      The last question I struggle with for pool bonding and the NEC requirements is bonding for pools that contain structural steel but also have a vinyl liner.

      NEC 680.26 B(1) states: Vinyl liners shall be considered to be nonconductive materials.
      680.26 B (2) states: Perimeter bonding shall be attached to pool reinforcing steel at 4 evenly spaced points around the pool perimeter, for nonconductive pools shells, bonding at 4 points shall NOT be required. The commentary goes on to say connection between the perimeter bonding and nonconductive shells is not required at all.
      Then 680.26 B (3) states: All metallic parts of the pool structure, including reinforcing metal not addressed in B(1) , shall be bonded.

      This just seems to me as conflicting sections. The majority (not all) of pools whether above ground or below, contain a vinyl liner with either rebar in concrete, or structural steel studs such as an above ground pool. Must the steel be bonded to the perimeter bonding at 4 points, 1 point, or no points since it is isolated with a vinyl liner???
      Just because an above ground pool has a vinyl liner does not mean that the alum / composite metal support post with in 5 ft. of the pool water does not require a bond to the bonding system.

      I commonly run into multiple situations with combination of non conductive and conductive materials with above ground pools

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        #18
        Can anyone explain in theory about the pool surface bonding method of a #8 bare copper, 18"-24" away from pool wall and buried 4"-6" deep.

        As I have seen several of these bonding systems up close in person, it seems to me as 1 single conductor buried under 4"-6" of loose fill would not likely provide good conductivity to a human's body (feet) to balance out the potential of when someone is standing on the perimeter surface and touching the pool water.

        Wouldn't it be much better conductivity and much less chance of potential differences to just require a concrete surface around every pool and call it done?
        I'm just trying to understand of how the NEC came up with (1) #8 wire, at 4"-6" in depth and 18"-24" away.

        Thoughts??

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          #19
          Originally posted by Lmeagles36 View Post
          Can anyone explain in theory about the pool surface bonding method of a #8 bare copper, 18"-24" away from pool wall and buried 4"-6" deep.

          As I have seen several of these bonding systems up close in person, it seems to me as 1 single conductor buried under 4"-6" of loose fill would not likely provide good conductivity to a human's body (feet) to balance out the potential of when someone is standing on the perimeter surface and touching the pool water.

          Wouldn't it be much better conductivity and much less chance of potential differences to just require a concrete surface around every pool and call it done?
          I'm just trying to understand of how the NEC came up with (1) #8 wire, at 4"-6" in depth and 18"-24" away.

          Thoughts??
          I don't know if I can explain in theory but basically the perimeter bonding takes any voltage that may have leaked into the earth from power company or some underground lines and keeps the pool area at the same potential.

          For instance , if there is a 2 volt leakage in the earth then everything associated with the pool is also at 2Volts thus no shock is possible
          They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
          She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
          I can't help it if I'm lucky

          Comment

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