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    UFER gone after framing

    Get to new residential build to install permanent service. Find that the framers cut off the UFER flush with the top of the poured wall and installed the pressure treated
    2"x8" top plate over it.

    Will 2 driven 5/8" x8' galvanized rods suffice for the Grounding electrode?
    Incoming water is plastic.

    Can the AHJ require that a CEE be put in after the fact?

    Thanks

    #2
    Originally posted by nizak View Post
    Get to new residential build to install permanent service. Find that the framers cut off the UFER flush with the top of the poured wall and installed the pressure treated
    2"x8" top plate over it.

    Will 2 driven 5/8" x8' galvanized rods suffice for the Grounding electrode?
    Incoming water is plastic.

    Can the AHJ require that a CEE be put in after the fact?

    Thanks
    The CEE still exists. You have to use it. The piece of rebar the concrete guys left for you is just for your convenience. It is not part of the CEE.

    You need to let the GC deal with this financially.
    Bob

    Comment


      #3
      ⚒👷

      Comment


        #4
        Just remember
        Do not talk about any discussion topics that could/should occur with the framers.
        Otherwise words like "premeditated" get thrown around.
        Without data you’re just another person with an opinion – Edwards Deming

        Comment


          #5
          Someone (not necessarily you) will have to chip into the foundation wall and make the connection to that rebar. Yours is unlikely to be the butt soon to be in a sling.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by gadfly56 View Post
            Someone (not necessarily you) will have to chip into the foundation wall and make the connection to that rebar. Yours is unlikely to be the butt soon to be in a sling.
            if anyone chips into the concrete it will need to be properly repaired and re-inspected. If the panelboard is in the basement it might be simpler to access the CEE connection from the inside.
            Bob

            Comment


              #7
              OP, was this a rebar stub or a CU wire?
              Master Electrician
              Electrical Contractor
              Richmond, VA

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by LarryFine View Post
                OP, was this a rebar stub or a CU wire?
                Originally posted by nizak View Post
                Get to new residential build to install permanent service. Find that the framers cut off the UFER flush with the top of the poured wall and installed the pressure treated 2"x8" top plate over it.
                As I read this, the OP says the conductor tied to the UFER is inside the poured concrete wall that is on top of the footing.

                If I could reasonably designate the place on the wall that the Grounding Electrode Conductor is in, I'd expect them to expose enough of it to install a non-reversible crimp.
                Another Al in Minnesota

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by nizak View Post
                  Get to new residential build to install permanent service. Find that the framers cut off the UFER flush with the top of the poured wall and installed the pressure treated
                  2"x8" top plate over it.

                  Will 2 driven 5/8" x8' galvanized rods suffice for the Grounding electrode?
                  Incoming water is plastic.

                  Can the AHJ require that a CEE be put in after the fact?

                  Thanks
                  Around here it is allowed to create another concrete encased electrode next to the footing with 20 feet of rebar or #4 wire encased in 2 inches of concrete. You would not have to break up concrete since the last sentence of 250.52(A)(3) states that where more than one CCE is present at a building, only one needs to be bonded to the grounding electrode system.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    It was a rebar stub.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by packersparky View Post
                      Around here it is allowed to create another concrete encased electrode next to the footing with 20 feet of rebar or #4 wire encased in 2 inches of concrete. You would not have to break up concrete since the last sentence of 250.52(A)(3) states that where more than one CCE is present at a building, only one needs to be bonded to the grounding electrode system.
                      sounds like a reasonable solution, especially if the foundation has not yet been back filled

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Oregon realized we're at the mercy of the building trades, and allows us not to use the CEE if it's not available.

                        I can't count how many times a customer would build and finish a shop, and then call us for a quote for the electrical at that point.....

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by nizak View Post
                          It was a rebar stub.
                          Can't enough foundation be chipped away to clamp a conductor to the stump?
                          Master Electrician
                          Electrical Contractor
                          Richmond, VA

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Cow View Post
                            Oregon realized we're at the mercy of the building trades, and allows us not to use the CEE if it's not available.

                            I can't count how many times a customer would build and finish a shop, and then call us for a quote for the electrical at that point.....
                            and I thought that only happened around here.
                            Tom
                            TBLO

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by nizak View Post
                              It was a rebar stub.
                              Not that big a deal. Just have the framers remove a piece of the 2X6 plate. Take a small chipping hammer and chip out a cup large enough to get an acorn clamp on the stub.

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