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680.26(B)(2)(b)

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    680.26(B)(2)(b)

    If you use unencapsulated structural reinforcing steel (USRS) in the pool shell can you still use a #8 bare copper conductor for the perimeter surface? Or do you have to use the same USRS in the perimeter grid to extend to three feet. Under 680.26(B)(2)(b) Alternate Means it states that where USRS is not available you can use a single copper conductor if you follow a few more requirements. The words "where not available " confuse me. Clearly it was available it was used in the shell? Or as long as you bond at four uniformly space points then a single #8 or larger copper conductor ran between 18 and 24 inches around the contour of the pool perimeter is compliant. It is also difficult for me to understand how a single copper conductor can be as effective as a a steel wire mesh or USRS covering the entire three foot space extending out from the pools inside wall?

    #2
    Originally posted by Tommyt63 View Post
    It is also difficult for me to understand how a single copper conductor can be as effective as a a steel wire mesh or USRS covering the entire three foot space extending out from the pools inside wall?
    I would say that woven wire mesh pulled up into the concrete for crack control may need bonded, i'm not sire it would qualify as the perimeter surface bonding if the pool structure does not extend out 3 ft,

    the section requires the conductor to be secured 4 to 6 inches below the surface of the perimeter it makes no distinction between conductors below the pavement or conductors within the pavement surface it simply states the conductor to be secured 4 to 6 below surface

    Woven wire mesh pulled up into the concrete to be effective for controlling cracks in concrete from separating usually would not remain secured 4 to 6 below finished surface

    I have only seen a few pools where the structure steel for the pool extends three ft beyond the water in the pool

    I have never seen the USRS extend three feet beyond the inside walls of the pool i am sure there are concrete pools out there that have walls that thick

    Comment


      #3
      David makes a good point about the wire mesh not being 4"-6" below sub-grade. The mesh is intended to be within a concrete pour so it's not 4"-6" below.

      We buit a large commercial outdoor pool about 8 years ago. We ran the bare #8 wire and had the wire mesh prepped so my mason could start the pour.
      The inspector said after I had the #8 wire in place, I could have substituted the wire mesh for the #8 wire. I did not agree and did not verbalize this as we wanted to pass and move onto the pour immediately. We did however bond the wire mesh as it fell within the requirement to bond anything metallic within 5' of the water.

      I have heard of rebar extending out beyond the pool and it is acceptable.

      The code is clear about the use of the #8 wire being run around the pool's perimeter hitting the 4 equidistant points from the pool's main rebar frame.

      I have found over the years, some inspectors have sometimes their own interpretation of the codes.

      Some pool guy some years ago was telling potential clients they used epoxy coated rebar because it's "better". Things is, it cannot be properly bonded unless you scrape the epoxy coating for your lugs and at every cross point of the rebar grid to ensure all the rebar is bonded.

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