Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cable guy

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Cable guy

    Click image for larger version

Name:	From Skitch.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	14.1 KB
ID:	2388939


    I know we are required to install the intersystem bonding bridge, but i think he may have fell asleep during that class.

    #2
    Can't see anything from that small picture.

    -Hal

    Comment


      #3
      I was upgrading a service on a house remodel. I had just finished installing the bonding bridge. A phone installer was there and asked if I had a split bolt. I told him if he needed that to bond to the system ground then he could use the bridge and not need a split bolt.
      I went to lunch and came back to find.............................................. ...
      Yep, the phone guy split bolted his ground right below my bonding bridge!
      If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time!

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by hbiss View Post
        Can't see anything from that small picture.

        -Hal
        Sorry, I thought you could enlarge. He clamped his bonding wire onto the metal pipe clamp around the PVC pipe.

        Comment


          #5
          Yeah, cable installers aren't always the brightest bulbs. You can't cite lack of training though, that guy was trained to put a ground clamp on the service conduit and that's exactly what he did.

          As for the phone guy, old habits die hard.

          -Hal

          Comment


            #6
            There is no requirement that the communications utility use the intersystem bonding point that the electrician is required to install.
            Don, Illinois
            (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

            Comment


              #7
              Small examples of why telecom installers should not have "baby" exams. Their test questions ask things like What color is the green screw that you connect the ground to? They are taught you need to know chapter 7 and ignore 1-6.

              Look at the mess of coax everywhere in the photo. Everyone else would get a fail from the inspector on neatness alone. If we just took anger bits and arbitrarily drilled holes through exterior walls we'd get a big fail on whichever Code applies. And half of them don't even put a box on the other end. Fail, fail, fail.

              Perhaps that's the problem. Let them pull permits and see h9w quickly practices change.

              Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
                There is no requirement that the communications utility use the intersystem bonding point that the electrician is required to install.
                So you are saying they are not required to follow the NEC.

                800.100,810.21,820.100,830.100 uses the words "shall be" Then 90.5 must apply.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by paulengr View Post
                  Small examples of why telecom installers should not have "baby" exams. Their test questions ask things like What color is the green screw that you connect the ground to? They are taught you need to know chapter 7 and ignore 1-6.

                  Look at the mess of coax everywhere in the photo. Everyone else would get a fail from the inspector on neatness alone. If we just took anger bits and arbitrarily drilled holes through exterior walls we'd get a big fail on whichever Code applies. And half of them don't even put a box on the other end. Fail, fail, fail.

                  Perhaps that's the problem. Let them pull permits and see h9w quickly practices change.

                  Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk
                  Keep in mind that cable and to a certain extent telecom installers are often independent contractors working for subcontractors to the cable or telephone company. They get paid by the piece, meaning that they get a fixed amount per install no matter how long it takes them or how difficult it might be or how long it takes to get there. And as you can guess, the pay per install isn't great. The only way to make any money is to do as many installs as possible per day. So there is no incentive for them to do anything but the quickest and easiest way possible so they can move on to the next job.

                  If you think that this should change and the cable companies should hire and have their own highly trained installers and pay them a decent wage- did you look at your cable bill lately? I don't know about you, but I pay more for pretty much basic cable than I pay for electric. And at least I find electric useful.

                  -Hal

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by kec View Post
                    So you are saying they are not required to follow the NEC.

                    800.100,810.21,820.100,830.100 uses the words "shall be" Then 90.5 must apply.
                    Except the telecom utilities are not under the scope of the NEC. NEC does not apply until the customer side of the demark.
                    Same as for service drops, NEC does not apply ahead of the service point.
                    See 90.4 and the IN at the end.

                    We install the Intersystem Bond to make it more likely the installer will use it.

                    Of course its the electrician who pulls a permit and would get the violation if the intersystem bond is not installed.
                    Moderator-Washington State
                    Ancora Imparo

                    Comment


                      #11
                      We actually saw an Intersystem bonding bar that was used. I think the one and only since day one.
                      Tom
                      TBLO

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by tom baker View Post
                        Except the telecom utilities are not under the scope of the NEC. NEC does not apply until the customer side of the demark.
                        Same as for service drops, NEC does not apply ahead of the service point.
                        See 90.2 and the IN at the end.

                        ...
                        That isn't what 90.2 says.

                        It says that 'not covered' includes 'installations of communications equipment under the exclusive control of of communications utilities located outdoors or in building spaces used exclusively for such installations'.

                        Note that it says 'equipment' and not cables or conductors. (The section that applies to electrical utilities contains no such specificity.) 800 contains requirements for cables and conductors.

                        Also in my experience the grounding conductor usually comes from the point of demarcation.

                        Also the point where they land their grounding conductor isn't typically under their exclusive control.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by kec View Post
                          So you are saying they are not required to follow the NEC.

                          800.100,810.21,820.100,830.100 uses the words "shall be" Then 90.5 must apply.
                          They are utilities and not subject to the rules in the NEC. 90.2(B)(4)
                          Don, Illinois
                          (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
                            They are utilities and not subject to the rules in the NEC. 90.2(B)(4)
                            That is not what 90.2(B)(4) says.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
                              They are utilities and not subject to the rules in the NEC. 90.2(B)(4)
                              That's not what NEC says.

                              In 30 CFR 1910.269 Annex A OSHA has clearly laid it out that for electric utilities where the equipment is part of the distribution system, distribution rules (NESC for utilities) applies. When it is a utilization system such as a receptacle in a substation, .subchapter S (NEC) applies. When it's both, both sets of rules apply. The same is true at a residence which is 100% utilization. NEC is quite clear on this. At least in North Carolina telecommunication contractor licensing uses a test on the NEC. So NEC applies not only because Article 90 says it does but because state law says it does.

                              I don't care how the utility pays their subs. They are subject to the same rules as the utility. If I'm a sub that does not give me permission to do crappy work either. I have made a cable contractor (Comcast) come back out and redo it. One call to the local Code official would fix these issues.

                              Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X