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Grounding Electrode Conductor vs. Bonding Jumper

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    Grounding Electrode Conductor vs. Bonding Jumper

    I'm sure this dead horse has been beaten to death but I'm not sure how to look up answers here. I was told that if I have a grounding electrode and the grounding electrode conductor has over 25 ohms I need another grounding electrode. I was told that the original GEC had to be removed and an "unspliced" GEC had to be installed from the panel to the first electrode and on to the second electrode all in one piece. My opinion is that the first GEC meets the requirements of the Code and that the connection to the second electrode would be a bonding jumper and the first GEC should stay in place. Your thought?

    #2
    Originally posted by Trey4U View Post
    My opinion is that the first GEC meets the requirements of the Code and that the connection to the second electrode would be a bonding jumper and the first GEC should stay in place. Your thought?
    You are correct. The only advantage to an unbroken conductor is to save a clamp.
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

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      #3
      I join Larry in agreement.
      250.64(C) has changed somewhat over the years and even today you will run into folks who any recall the words "shall be continuous"..
      At my age, I'm accustomed to restaurants asking me to pay in advance, but now my bank has started sending me their calendar one month at a time.

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        #4
        Originally posted by Trey4U View Post
        I'm sure this dead horse has been beaten to death but I'm not sure how to look up answers here. I was told that if I have a grounding electrode and the grounding electrode conductor has over 25 ohms I need another grounding electrode. I was told that the original GEC had to be removed and an "unspliced" GEC had to be installed from the panel to the first electrode and on to the second electrode all in one piece. My opinion is that the first GEC meets the requirements of the Code and that the connection to the second electrode would be a bonding jumper and the first GEC should stay in place. Your thought?
        What type of electrode? Only ground rods have the 25Ω maximum.
        Rob

        Moderator

        All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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          #5
          Originally posted by infinity View Post
          What type of electrode? Only ground rods have the 25Ω maximum.
          Here in Afghanistan all we have are ground rods and they're putting them at every panel no matter where or what kind they are. They automatically put in two to cover themselves. During ditch back fill the GEC from the first rod to the second got cut. The guy in charge said he had to change out the whole GEC to make it continuous. I thought I was right but wanted input from here. I didn't even try to explain.

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            #6
            Originally posted by Trey4U View Post
            Here in Afghanistan all we have are ground rods and they're putting them at every panel no matter where or what kind they are. They automatically put in two to cover themselves. During ditch back fill the GEC from the first rod to the second got cut. The guy in charge said he had to change out the whole GEC to make it continuous. I thought I was right but wanted input from here. I didn't even try to explain.
            Yes, you are correct. A good one from Mike:

            Rob

            Moderator

            All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

            Comment


              #7
              Even the GEC to the first rod can be spliced as long as the splice is irreversible

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