Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Antenna and Dish Grounding Question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Antenna and Dish Grounding Question

    I'm a bit confused about whether there should be two or three grounds for outdoor antennas. Meaning, some literature online states both the mast and coax cable should be grounded, however other literature also includes a separate ground to the mount as well (so a total of three components are grounds, the mast, mount, and coax cable). Interesting many online diagrams I see online and manuals show mounts and mast, but rarely do I see a ground wire connection to the mounts, just tnear the bottom of the mast and a ground block or llightning arrestor for the coax cable. The both claim to be NEC standard in their diagrams and manuals. S

    o my question basically is, should the mount also be grounded with a separate ground wire or is grounding the mount not necessary / redundant as long as the bottom of mast and coax cable is grounded near home entry.

    #2
    As long as the mast and mount is clamped together I see no reason for separate grounds. You can attach your ground to either the mount or mast and be compliant with the NEC.

    -Hal

    Comment


      #3
      Depends on a few things. Does the literature specifically say "separate" wire, or does it just say "grounded". If you bond 3 items together and then ground that bond, you have grounded all 3 items with one wire.

      Does the literature say "grounded to EGC", or is it suggesting just grounded to earth?

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by FionaZuppa View Post
        Does the literature say "grounded to EGC", or is it suggesting just grounded to earth?
        The OP didn't get into what to do with the ground wire "at the other end". Hopefully he knows what to do to be compliant with the NEC.

        Keep in mind that sometimes the manufacturers of these things don't provide instructions that will result in an installation that is compliant with the Code. This is where the installer needs to be knowledgeable.

        -Hal

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by hbiss View Post

          The OP didn't get into what to do with the ground wire "at the other end". Hopefully he knows what to do to be compliant with the NEC.

          Keep in mind that sometimes the manufacturers of these things don't provide instructions that will result in an installation that is compliant with the Code. This is where the installer needs to be knowledgeable.

          -Hal
          Yep, "the other end" is where we see issues with not connecting to the premise GE system. See way too many sat dishes/cable connected to their own islanded grounding electrode.

          Comment


            #6
            Only one rod for all, but should also be connected to service electrode(s).
            Master Electrician
            Electrical Contractor
            Richmond, VA

            Comment


              #7
              Rules for mast bonding are in art 810. Antennas and mast are bonded to the inter system bond point with a minimum 10 awg copper, if you install a separate ground rod by the antenna mast, bond to the power system GES with a 6 AWG copper. the most important point is with 1, 2 or 3 ground rods to bond them to the power system GES to create a single point bond/
              Last edited by tom baker; 10-17-19, 07:12 PM.
              Moderator-Washington State
              Ancora Imparo

              Comment

              Working...
              X