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Bond wire - Fiberglass pool

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    #16
    I just want to mention that we always run the bond wire around the pool perimeter despite the use of wire mesh or any rebar used in a concrete pour. I'd rather have it in place.


    Setting any steel outside of a concrete pour in the earth would corrode and lose the bonding it was intended for.

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      #17
      I like the 2 bond wire scenario (at different depth/height).

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        #18
        Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
        No one seems to know what sub grade is but IMO, the subgrade is the dirt below the concrete. I have to agree with the inspector. BTW, it doesn't matter what the electricians state-- unless they can show that it is not safe 4-6" down then they don't have a prayer to stand on.

        IMO, you want the wire into the top not ontop as the wire is trying to make contact with any voltage gradient that may exist. It seems it would be better below the dirt-- just my opinion.
        We are not trying to make a grounding electrode with this perimeter bonding we are trying to assure there is no voltage gradients at the surface of the pool perimeter - to which a pool user would have potential to come into contact with different voltages between the pool and/or points along the perimeter.

        That said a voltage gradient very well can exist as you move away from the pool and any outer edge of what perimeter bonding metals are existing. Perimeter that is poured concrete with any metal reinforcement or simply bonding wire embedded will likely be a better surface at reducing voltage gradients than a simple bonding wire in the earth near the edge of the pool. The fact it is around the pool probably increases the chance there is moisture present in the sub soil which helps the effectiveness of any perimeter bonding method period. If the pool is seldom used that may decrease chances some though.

        ETA: if you put the bonding wire too deep you will have too much voltage gradient between your bonging wire and the surface and users of the pool will be subjected to that voltage.
        Last edited by kwired; 11-11-19, 10:22 AM.
        I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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          #19
          Originally posted by kwired View Post

          We are not trying to make a grounding electrode with this perimeter bonding we are trying to assure there is no voltage gradients at the surface of the pool perimeter - to which a pool user would have potential to come into contact with different voltages between the pool and/or points along the perimeter.

          That said a voltage gradient very well can exist as you move away from the pool and any outer edge of what perimeter bonding metals are existing. Perimeter that is poured concrete with any metal reinforcement or simply bonding wire embedded will likely be a better surface at reducing voltage gradients than a simple bonding wire in the earth near the edge of the pool. The fact it is around the pool probably increases the chance there is moisture present in the sub soil which helps the effectiveness of any perimeter bonding method period. If the pool is seldom used that may decrease chances some though.
          I know it isn't an electrode but if there is voltage in the soil do you not thing being in the soil would be better than in the concrete where there is likely to more contact.
          They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
          She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
          I can't help it if I'm lucky

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            #20
            Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post

            I know it isn't an electrode but if there is voltage in the soil do you not thing being in the soil would be better than in the concrete where there is likely to more contact.
            The goal is equipotential at user accessible surfaces, we don't even care if the entire pool and other bonded components are sitting there at 1000 volts to ground, just so there is no potential that users can come across.

            The soil is likely to be at "earth potential", but like I said we are more concerned about potential at the surface and this bonding is installed for the purpose of equalizing that and is bonded to the rest of the pool components so they are all the same potential.

            ETA: the fact that we bring an equipment grounding conductor to pool equipment makes it possible for everything bonded to it, which is also connected to the grounded service conductor, which is also connected to the utility company MGN (in a majority of cases) to have voltage drop of the grounded service conductor or even voltage drop of the utility MGN to be imposed on the pool and all bonded components - which will result in a voltage between those items and "earth".
            I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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