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Insulation type for typical grounding conductors?

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    #16
    Originally posted by Isaiah View Post

    I should clarify: The insulated #4/0 is not really intended to be an electrode, i.e. Ground Ring in the truest sense per 250.52(A)(4).Its really a very large, intricate bonding jumper used to connect grounding electrodes such as ground rods etc installed plant wide. Its also buried only 18" instead of 30". The 'taps' from the #4/0, are #2/0 and #2 insulated. I was simply inquiring as to what was the typical insulation type, such as XHHW-2, THHN/THWN etc, utilized for these conductors.
    I do however agree, the system would be more effective overall if the conductors were bare instead of insulated - but that is not what the client wants.
    Thanks for the clarification, since the conductor can be bare and is not required to be insulated I would use whatever insulation type is cheapest. If this conductor qualifies as a GEC it is not required to be buried 18" deep that would be a design issue.
    Rob

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    All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

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      #17
      Originally posted by infinity View Post

      Thanks for the clarification, since the conductor can be bare and is not required to be insulated I would use whatever insulation type is cheapest. If this conductor qualifies as a GEC it is not required to be buried 18" deep that would be a design issue.
      Yes, exactly my thoughts, why use XHHW-2 for this application?

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        #18
        Originally posted by Isaiah View Post

        Yes, exactly my thoughts, why use XHHW-2 for this application?
        Depending on where you are getting the direction to use XHHW-2, it may be to reduce unintentional contact with earth to reduce circulating currents or some other perceived reason. XHHW-2 is pretty tough / robust and maybe they want it to resist penetration from backfill or other debris.
        Ron

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          #19
          Originally posted by ron View Post

          Depending on where you are getting the direction to use XHHW-2, it may be to reduce unintentional contact with earth to reduce circulating currents or some other perceived reason. XHHW-2 is pretty tough / robust and maybe they want it to resist penetration from backfill or other debris.
          This is coming from one of the Client standard details, I believe your last statement "XHHW-2 is pretty tough / robust and maybe they want it to resist penetration from backfill or other debris" is the most probable reasoning.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Isaiah View Post

            This is coming from one of the Client standard details, I believe your last statement "XHHW-2 is pretty tough / robust and maybe they want it to resist penetration from backfill or other debris" is the most probable reasoning.
            I have yet to see plastic insulation that is tougher than the copper conductor it is insulating.
            Cheers and Stay Safe,

            Marky the Sparky

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