Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PVC 100% watertight

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #31
    Originally posted by active1 View Post
    ???

    A problem with ground water entering the basement below grade penetration around the conduit? No.

    A problem with water entering the raceway say 2' deep and flowing up above grade say 2' in the raceway? Never seen that.
    It would take a 4' difference in elevation with the conduit pitched and standing water / saturated soil on the high ground. Naturally the water would just flow down hill unless something caused it to be retained.

    Goes back to design. Cristy box, drain hole in gutter / LB / Can, or a penetration in a different location to avoid a potential standing water area such as a loading dock ramp.

    Regardless still a lot better then drilling holes in the subterranean foundation.
    Is dependent on what is the source of the water and elevation of that source in relation to the ends of the pipe - simple hydraulics - if the pipe fills with water higher then one of the ends, it will run out of the lower end.

    If ground water level is an issue, you probably don't have a basement in the first place. If you do it is probably flooded a lot regardless.

    If you have a well sealed conduit (at couplings and joints below grade) then any water inside is either a result of condensation or maybe missing cap on a weatherhead or bad or missing drip loop on conductors at a weatherhead. Those could still fill the raceway and run into the building once the raceway is filled to same level as the entry point.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

    Comment


      #32
      Simple hydraulics?
      Where have you you ever seen a situation like you described?
      Have you ever, I mean ever in your career seen such a situation so remote like you describe?
      If you it was a poor design for the extreme situation.

      Weatherhead? We're discussing underground.

      Groundwater issue you don't have a basement.
      Do you get out of Fremont much?
      You ever hear of a sump pump, sump pump back up, multiple sump pumps, super seal membrane, or drain tile?

      Please keep busting holes in subterranean foundations and goop it up good. I don't care.

      But don't, I mean don't contaminate the rest of the internet with your messed up way with the justification that any other way will flood and be worse.

      Comment


        #33
        Originally posted by active1 View Post
        Simple hydraulics?
        Where have you you ever seen a situation like you described?
        Have you ever, I mean ever in your career seen such a situation so remote like you describe?
        If you it was a poor design for the extreme situation.

        Weatherhead? We're discussing underground.

        Groundwater issue you don't have a basement.
        Do you get out of Fremont much?
        You ever hear of a sump pump, sump pump back up, multiple sump pumps, super seal membrane, or drain tile?

        Please keep busting holes in subterranean foundations and goop it up good. I don't care.

        But don't, I mean don't contaminate the rest of the internet with your messed up way with the justification that any other way will flood and be worse.
        I never said any other way will flood and be worse, just was trying to point out that it still could let water in and gave some reasons why.

        I've seen poor drip loop installation cause plenty of water to enter buildings via raceways that were not below grade at all, schtuff happens.

        Sump pumps, membranes, drain tile, all can still fail and if you absolutely needed them in the first place because of natural water infiltration - the result is not good. Most avoid having a basement at all in those situations in this area. There is areas here where water table is not very far down at all. One town nearby has almost no basements, older ones that are there have water issues, the few newer ones there may be are usually limited to mechanical rooms and storm shelters, and are on ground that had been built up, not dug down into the water table.
        I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

        Comment


          #34
          Originally posted by active1 View Post
          Simple hydraulics?
          Where have you you ever seen a situation like you described?
          Have you ever, I mean ever in your career seen such a situation so remote like you describe?
          If you it was a poor design for the extreme situation.

          Weatherhead? We're discussing underground.

          Groundwater issue you don't have a basement.
          Do you get out of Fremont much?
          You ever hear of a sump pump, sump pump back up, multiple sump pumps, super seal membrane, or drain tile?

          Please keep busting holes in subterranean foundations and goop it up good. I don't care.

          But don't, I mean don't contaminate the rest of the internet with your messed up way with the justification that any other way will flood and be worse.

          Yes I have seen a river flowing out of a conduit because it was in saturated ground and the joints did not seal. Yes I have seen water flow out of an above grade conduit several feet off the ground due to hydraulic pressure from higher ground.

          I dont have a problem with penetrating a foundation below grade in most cases. It depends on the circumstances. There are two concerns: water entering through the conduit, and water entering around the conduit penetration. Regarding the former, that is why I mentioned making quality joints and then that shouldn't be a problem. I have done the up and back down method a few times where I didnt install the pipe and I could tell it had a good amount of flowing water in it. As far as the conduit penetration, it should be a cast in pipe. Also a properly done foundation will be backfilled with stone and daylighted out so there will not be any hydrostatic pressure on the wall anyway. If that is not the case due to not doing it or it was impossible, then you are going to have far greater problems through the floor and eventual cracks anyway.
          Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

          "You can't generalize"

          Comment


            #35
            Originally posted by brantmacga View Post
            Someone actually pooped in a 4" stub up on one of our jobs. Guys said the tape was cut, went over to inspect, found a nice turd sitting in the elbow. [emoji90]


            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
            [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23]

            Sent from my VS987 using Tapatalk

            Comment


              #36
              Originally posted by truck41trouble View Post
              [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23] [emoji23]

              Sent from my VS987 using Tapatalk
              Our faces were the opposite of that emoji that day [emoji58]

              I can say though I had no part of that wire pull [emoji51]


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
              [COLOR="Blue"]Brought to you by Carl's Jr.[/COLOR]

              Comment

              Working...
              X