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Labor Units from Mike Holt Pdf

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  • cdslotz
    replied
    Originally posted by ronball View Post
    Wanting to be more competitive on large Residential complexes.
    What are some of you using for average labor rates? It will have around 4000 hrs.

    Central Illinois area.
    Thx Ron
    Your average rate is YOUR average rate.
    What will your average manloading be on the job? 8 men? 20 men?

    Leave a comment:


  • oldsparky52
    replied
    Originally posted by lakecitieselectric View Post
    ... but I land work all day long using the example above.
    In the end, that's what matters (assuming you show a profit at the end of the year).

    Leave a comment:


  • ronball
    replied
    Labor Rates

    Originally posted by cdslotz View Post
    Try doing that when you have a job with 8000 estimated man/hrs
    Wanting to be more competitive on large Residential complexes.
    What are some of you using for average labor rates? It will have around 4000 hrs.

    Central Illinois area.
    Thx Ron

    Leave a comment:


  • Christoph
    replied
    Originally posted by ChandlerBing View Post
    I think the question has been answered as to how to read 14-2, 9.6, c-hundred. As for the dollar amount to use is all dependent upon the area you work. We are union and have union rates that we charge, and for labor factoring that is dependent upon factors such as vertical rise of the building. There are many other factors, but I don't want to detract from the initial question.
    Could you BE anymore precise?

    Leave a comment:


  • ChandlerBing
    replied
    Labor Units

    I think the question has been answered as to how to read 14-2, 9.6, c-hundred. As for the dollar amount to use is all dependent upon the area you work. We are union and have union rates that we charge, and for labor factoring that is dependent upon factors such as vertical rise of the building. There are many other factors, but I don't want to detract from the initial question.

    Leave a comment:


  • lakecitieselectric
    replied
    Originally posted by cdslotz View Post
    Try doing that when you have a job with 8000 estimated man/hrs
    I guess that's what I'm trying to say. There is a huge difference between service work and jobs. In service you have to make up for the non-billable hours. They say in a year your true billable hours are between 1200-1500.

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  • cdslotz
    replied
    Try doing that when you have a job with 8000 estimated man/hrs

    Leave a comment:


  • cdslotz
    replied
    My labor on a large commercial job....shoot, even a small one would be less than $500 for 100' run.

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  • lakecitieselectric
    replied
    Originally posted by cdslotz View Post
    You would never get a job using your service rate applied to labor units.
    They are designed to use your shop rate, which is your average rate (your cost) of your entire shop, top to bottom (not including foremen, superintendent, management, etc)
    Ours ran (before I retired) was around $28/hr, then add labor burden, OH&P
    The above was an example for person who posted the question; however I win jobs all the time with my service rates using labor units right from accubid. This would be my price to run a 100' dedicated circuit in conduit. What would be yours? Labor only so, as our material prices are easy to figure. will saying runing through bar joist then down a sheet rock wall.
    1/2" emt .04 x 100 = 4 hours x 95.00 = 380.00
    1/2" straps .06 x 20 = 1.2 hours x 95.00 = 190.00
    1/2" conn. .05 x 2 = 0.1 hours x 95.00 = 9.50
    1/2" coup .05 x 11 = .55 hours x 95.00 =52.25
    #12 wire .006 x 345 = 2.07 hours x 95.00 = 196.65
    4sq box .23 x 1= .23 hours x 95.00 = 21.85
    4sq ind duplex cover .03 x 1 = .03 hours x 95.00 = 2.85
    20 amp Ivory duplex rec. .02 x 1 = .02 hours x 95.00 = 1.90
    20 amp breaker 120/240 .25 x 1 = .25 hours x 95.00 = 23.75
    Misc Hard ware anchors, nuts/ bolts - .5 x 1 = .5 hours x 95.00 = 47.50
    __________________________________________________ ____________

    Labor only to run a 100' dedicated circuit through bar joist and down a sheet rock wall 926.25 and about 8.95 hours for 1 man or 4.47 for 2 guys. Are you saying this is to high???? I always thought you only use the rates that you are talking about is when you have guys on a big job that are getting 40 hours a week billable for a long period of time. The reason a service rate is higher is because you are accounting for the the non-billable hours too, but labor units are labor units. You can adjust them up according to the difficulty of the job of course. I'm willing to learn if I'm wrong, but I land work all day long using the example above.
    Last edited by lakecitieselectric; 02-19-19, 08:55 AM.

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  • cdslotz
    replied
    Originally posted by lakecitieselectric View Post
    Typically it means you can run a 100' in 9.6 hours or 9.6/100= .096 per foot. So if you charge 95.00 an hour and you run 50' of 14/2 you would charge .096 x 50'=4.8 x 95.00=456.00 for 50' and this is just to run the wire only; however I would have to see whatever it is you are looking at as the labor per foot should be somewhere around .01 per foot and not .096. They must have put a labor factor on it for difficulty.

    You would never get a job using your service rate applied to labor units.
    They are designed to use your shop rate, which is your average rate (your cost) of your entire shop, top to bottom (not including foremen, superintendent, management, etc)
    Ours ran (before I retired) was around $28/hr, then add labor burden, OH&P

    Leave a comment:


  • lakecitieselectric
    replied
    Typically it means you can run a 100' in 9.6 hours or 9.6/100= .096 per foot. So if you charge 95.00 an hour and you run 50' of 14/2 you would charge .096 x 50'=4.8 x 95.00=456.00 for 50' and this is just to run the wire only; however I would have to see whatever it is you are looking at as the labor per foot should be somewhere around .01 per foot and not .096. They must have put a labor factor on it for difficulty.

    Leave a comment:


  • pkelectrical
    started a topic Labor Units from Mike Holt Pdf

    Labor Units from Mike Holt Pdf


    How do the labor units work? on first page it says Armor cable 14-2, 9.6 labor, C-hundred, I am not sure how to read that.

    Do you know what is included in this? Is this measure per foot?

    Thank you
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