Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Emergency/Exit lights height for warehouses

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Emergency/Exit lights height for warehouses

    Is there any code requirements for Emergency/Exit lights height location on a warehouse? Lets say 30 feet high.
    Miguel

    All things, therefore, that you want men to do to you, you also must likewise do to them

    #2
    Exit signs
    https://forums.mikeholt.com/showthread.php?t=184338


    For exit lights, it is based on the design of the light fixture and having the code required amount of FC on the floor.
    Ron

    Comment


      #3
      You're required one foot candle at the floor for the entire path of travel to the exit. Now that's actually not that much light, so you may be ok.
      I can build anything you want if you draw a picture of it on the back of a big enough check.

      There's no substitute for hard work....but that doesn't mean I'm going to give up trying to find one.

      John Childress
      Electrical Inspector
      IAEI / CEI / C10
      Certified Electrical Inspector

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by cowboyjwc View Post
        You're required one foot candle at the floor for the entire path of travel to the exit. Now that's actually not that much light, so you may be ok.
        Isn't there something about being in line of sight along with the door or some such? If too high, a person may not see it or think to look for it.
        Yes, I'll be happy to do a first class job for less than anyone else and take a dollar a week for 10 years.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by jmellc View Post
          Isn't there something about being in line of sight along with the door or some such? If too high, a person may not see it or think to look for it.
          You're talking exit locator signs, not egress pathway lighting.

          Look at Ron's linked forum thread.
          Master Electrician
          Electrical Contractor
          Richmond, VA

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by cowboyjwc View Post
            You're required one foot candle at the floor for the entire path of travel to the exit. Now that's actually not that much light, so you may be ok.
            This is a common misconception (NFPA 101 7.9.2); it's actually a 1FC average as opposed to a 1FC minimum. There is a maximum to minimum ratio of no more than 40:1, meaning, if you have a maximum of 4FC, the minimum light measured has to be 0.1FC or greater. Average light means nothing without uniformity criteria attached to it. For example, you could have a football field with all of the stadium lights directed to one end of the end zone; it would have the same 'average' light across the whole field, but it would look pretty dark on the opposite side. Now, using those same amount of lights, you equally aim them. Your average would be the same, but your uniformity ratio (maximum to minimum) would be much lower and the field would look much better. All of that to say, whenever you see only a lighting requirement, it's best to see that there is also a uniformity requirement attached to it.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by tw1156 View Post
              This is a common misconception (NFPA 101 7.9.2); it's actually a 1FC average as opposed to a 1FC minimum. There is a maximum to minimum ratio of no more than 40:1, meaning, if you have a maximum of 4FC, the minimum light measured has to be 0.1FC or greater. Average light means nothing without uniformity criteria attached to it. For example, you could have a football field with all of the stadium lights directed to one end of the end zone; it would have the same 'average' light across the whole field, but it would look pretty dark on the opposite side. Now, using those same amount of lights, you equally aim them. Your average would be the same, but your uniformity ratio (maximum to minimum) would be much lower and the field would look much better. All of that to say, whenever you see only a lighting requirement, it's best to see that there is also a uniformity requirement attached to it.
              As additional info, I have found that when the AHJ makes a code reference for egress lighting levels, it is usually to the adopted building code first and if it doesn't have a reference, then they go to the life safety code (NFPA 101).
              For example, most jurisdictions adopt the IBC for a building code, which has 1008.3.5 for minimum average values and acceptable ratios.
              https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/IB...eans-of-egress
              Ron

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by mtnelectrical View Post
                Is there any code requirements for Emergency/Exit lights height location on a warehouse? Lets say 30 feet high.
                I do not know if there is requirement but I would go with manufacture specks
                If you put it too high will not give you to much light on the floor or if there is smoke you will not see any light on the floor


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                Comment


                  #9
                  Exit Signs

                  check out NFPA 101, 7.10.1.9

                  Egress markings (i think that's Exit Signs) not more than 6'-8" above the top edge of the opening...

                  So, for a 7'-0" door, that's a max of 13'-8" AFF.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X