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    #16
    Originally posted by myspark View Post
    While the suggestions are well and good the criteria that was set aside by OP was not addressed completely.
    Moving a heavy equipment requires absolute care to avoid damage and injury to personnel and equipment. Hence, there are specialists called riggers.

    The moving part (ie.) loading, unloading, lifting and spotting the load in place are straightforward.
    OP mentioned that this equipment is going to be hauled-in (moved) into an elevator.
    Most commercial medium sized passenger elevators are rated 2500 lbs to 5000 lbs

    Class A freight elevator is rated almost the same as a passenger elevator.

    OP did not state the rated capacity of the elevator that he intends to use. . . although he stated it will fit and the weight capacity is OK”.

    The recommended loading for elevators is limited to 25% of their rated load.

    So, an equipment weighing 3200 lbs would require a rated 12800 lbs. elevator . It would be a non-standard, custom made elevator.

    Don’t be fooled with elevator rating thinking your 3200 lbs load can be handled by a 5000 lbs elevator.

    I had hoisted an MCC /Distribution panel to a rooftop, inside a shed and I had to hire a Sikorsky Helicopter Crane to lift it to the roof and roll it in place.
    The building elevator wasn’t big enough-- beside the openings were just regular door openings.

    It cost the company over $6500 for a forty five minute gig. This was twenty years ago.
    The helicopter was based at an airport about 3 miles from the company grounds.

    If you haven’t done this before check below link:

    Better still, as one poster said, hire a rigger.
    If still in doubt check with your OSHA Checklist. Don't hold me for something I missed.


    https://www.elevators.com/freight-elevator-classes/
    Not an elevator expert, but if it has enough space to easily fit about 20 people it can probably handle 3200 pounds. 20 people (easily) is probably somewhat large for passenger elevators. But surely they figure at least 150 pounds per person if not more and are still leaving some allowance to go over.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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      #17
      Originally posted by myspark View Post

      The recommended loading for elevators is limited to 25% of their rated load.

      So, an equipment weighing 3200 lbs would require a rated 12800 lbs. elevator . It would be a non-standard, custom made elevator.

      Don’t be fooled with elevator rating thinking your 3200 lbs load can be handled by a 5000 lbs elevator.
      I know of no one who would be concerned with putting a 3200 pound piece of equipment in an elevator rated for 5000 pounds, on a construction site it happens every day. If this is new construction he may even have temporary elevators with a 6500 pound or higher capacity.
      Rob

      Moderator

      All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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        #18
        Originally posted by infinity View Post
        I know of no one who would be concerned with putting a 3200 pound piece of equipment in an elevator rated for 5000 pounds, on a construction site it happens every day. If this is new construction he may even have temporary elevators with a 6500 pound or higher capacity.
        How often do you see people calculating whether or not everyone that wants to get in a passenger elevator will exceed capacity? Busy places they will jam themselves in there like sardines in a can no matter what rating may be.

        Go to a hotel with college or NFL football team staying there and have all the "big guys" go somewhere at about same time and need to use elevator to get there - you might be pushing limits if not a very heavily rated elevator. Just 10 of the right players in that situation may load it to more than 3200.
        I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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          #19
          Originally posted by kwired View Post
          How often do you see people calculating whether or not everyone that wants to get in a passenger elevator will exceed capacity? Busy places they will jam themselves in there like sardines in a can no matter what rating may be.

          Go to a hotel with college or NFL football team staying there and have all the "big guys" go somewhere at about same time and need to use elevator to get there - you might be pushing limits if not a very heavily rated elevator. Just 10 of the right players in that situation may load it to more than 3200.
          I agree, that's why I'm questioning the loading of only 25%. If I had to move a 3200# transformer and the nameplate on the elevator said 5000#'s then all is good.
          Rob

          Moderator

          All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

          Comment


            #20
            Not sure about elevators, freight or passenger, but with all other rigging design requirements call for a factor of 3 if it's not lifting people and 5 if it is. The marked capacity is after applying the safety factor. So if I design a beam to support a load and the capacity is 15 tons at failure, the beam will be marked 5 tons if it is used to lift material. If it is a tie off for fall protection, it would be rated 3 tons. The safety factor varies from standard to standard but they all work the same for rigging.

            So it makes sense to me that if an elevator is designed for 20,000 lbs. that the name plate would be 5,000 lbs. But just the opposite, giving a name plate rating at failure would be stupid.

            Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

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              #21
              The Egyptians would have had it done by now
              Dave Ruth

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                #22
                Using 2 conduit as a roller I think will be enough for that purposes.

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