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    UPS Install

    Have a UPS with separate battery cabinet which will come shipped with batteries in. The cabinet weighs 3,200lbs. Is there anyway you guys know of that this could be moved into elevator and into place without removing batteries? It will fit in elevator and the weight capacity is okay. I just don’t see what could be used to move this. Darn sure not a pallet jack I guess? Hoping not to have to hire rigger.
    Last edited by Little Bill; 07-11-19, 02:16 PM. Reason: watch the language

    #2
    Roll-R-Lifts

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    Some people are like slinkies. They serve absolutely no useful purpose. But still put a smile on your face when pushed down a flight of stairs.

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      #3
      If the delivery sets it on the concrete slab floor. You might be able to roll it using 2 inch rigid conduit. Their might be an issue with the floor scratching. You could lay cardboard down .

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        #4
        Forgot the link

        https://www.dkhardware.com/rol-a-lif...xoChNUQAvD_BwE

        Sent from my LML211BL using Tapatalk
        Some people are like slinkies. They serve absolutely no useful purpose. But still put a smile on your face when pushed down a flight of stairs.

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          #5
          Originally posted by masterinbama View Post
          Forgot the link

          https://www.dkhardware.com/rol-a-lif...xoChNUQAvD_BwE

          Sent from my LML211BL using Tapatalk
          Sunbelt rents them.

          Sent from my LML211BL using Tapatalk
          Some people are like slinkies. They serve absolutely no useful purpose. But still put a smile on your face when pushed down a flight of stairs.

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            #6
            Originally posted by mstrlucky74 View Post
            Have a UPS with separate battery cabinet which will come shipped with batteries in. The cabinet weighs 3,200lbs. Is there anyway you guys know of that this could be moved into elevator and into place without removing batteries? It will fit in elevator and the weight capacity is okay. I just don’t see what could be used to move this. Darn sure not a pallet jack I guess? Hoping not to have to hire rigger.
            why screw around with something like this. pay the riggers and be done with it.
            Last edited by Little Bill; 07-11-19, 02:17 PM. Reason: Edited quote that was edited
            Bob

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              #7
              Originally posted by mstrlucky74 View Post
              Have a UPS with separate battery cabinet which will come shipped with batteries in. The cabinet weighs 3,200lbs. Is there anyway you guys know of that this could be moved into elevator and into place without removing batteries? It will fit in elevator and the weight capacity is okay. I just don’t see what could be used to move this. Darn sure not a pallet jack I guess? Hoping not to have to hire rigger.
              You have a cheap pallet jack? Google search I did had quite a few of them rated 5500 pounds.
              Last edited by Little Bill; 07-11-19, 02:18 PM. Reason: Edited quote that was edited
              I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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                #8
                We move things like that all of the time. A manual 5500 pound pallet jack will work if you have level surfaces and some beefy electricians. We use an electric pallet jacks and move transformers up to 10,000 pounds. Where is this battery unit being installed? Can it just be rolled into place?
                Rob

                Moderator

                All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by infinity View Post
                  We move things like that all of the time. A manual 5500 pound pallet jack will work if you have level surfaces and some beefy electricians. We use an electric pallet jacks and move transformers up to 10,000 pounds. Where is this battery unit being installed? Can it just be rolled into place?

                  In electrical room. Yes it can be rolled into place but not once room is built, wont get through door. Room not built yet. How they heck do you handle that?

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                    #10
                    You need someone with some rigging/material handling experience and the right equipment, otherwise you should hire a rigger. I've posted this before, here's about a 9600 pound transformer we moved and set with two skates, two toe jacks, some 3/4" galvanized steel rollers, and a motorized pallet jack. One toe jack is in the lower left corner.

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                    Rob

                    Moderator

                    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by kwired View Post
                      You have a cheap pallet jack? Google search I did had quite a few of them rated 5500 pounds.
                      TY

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by mstrlucky74 View Post
                        In electrical room. Yes it can be rolled into place but not once room is built, wont get through door. Room not built yet. How they heck do you handle that?
                        The idiot who designed the room figures he'll be long gone when it comes time to replace it.

                        -Hal

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                          #13
                          This is bull rigging. Moving loads sideways without a crane, chain or cable hoist, etc.. A lot of rigging crews don't even know how to do it. It's really easy if you learn a couple techniques. But I can say that it's highly technique based. We frequently do things in hours that take other crews much longer, we do a lot of jobs where we win bids either because nobody else will do it or we come in much cheaper overall.

                          First get rid of the friction. Second, move it wherever you want to go. It's as easy as that!

                          Pay attention to the floor. This is bull rigging after all. Look for elevation changes, cracks, gratings, door thresholds, ramps, etc. Look for lifting and pulling points. Might need to add straps, beams, A frame, etc. Figure out a way around every one. Basically plan the whole lift out before you ever start. Once to gather equipment. Repeat as a crew review before you start so everyone knows what to expect and do. That way man A doesn't fight man B moving in opposite directions. Never underestimate the value of spotters at critical points where the riggers can't see or are paying attention elsewhere.

                          1. Machine skates. Tens of thousands of pounds for a few hundred dollars with 3 skates. Works safer and bettsr than rolling except limited on crossing uneven floors. Use floor plates or plywood for that. You will need a way to lift and place the skates. We use either jacks or large 4 foot pry bars. Sometimes you strap cribbinv to it just to create a lifting point. Best setup is 3 skates so you can steer it. Never 4. Some come with a handle to tow with.

                          2. Medium duty toe jacks. Same idea but comes with it's own raising/lowering. Toe jacks take more space to work around and have more weight limits, cost more, and really limited to enclosures, but awesome in those cases. If I can use toe jacks, I prefer them over skatss. We can assemble an entire switchgear lineup and two men can easily walk it into place.

                          3. Pinch bars. Ok it's old school but if you don't have far to go and you can get under it easily I can move tens of thousands of pounds with almost no space to work in but only an inch or two at a time. Great for tight spots and final placement, and cheap.its rare we don't bar something over a 1/4" or something like that when we line things up. A century ago this is how almost all machine placements, warehouse moves, etc., were done. I've placed a 20,000 pump shell with two 18" pinch bars with 1" wedge ends in a cramped dredge working bent over on my knees. A 3200 lb. UPS should be easy. With a bar best to have two. First technique is up against a wall for instance insert bar and pry off the wall sideways. Second is put in one to lift a little then slide in second and work them both in. Work in on the rear. Then flip one bar over so the flat is on the load. Lift so the edge digs in and the load slides off it. On a flat floor you can often walk it right across the floor one handed. Third is get both bars under it but on the side. Lift up with one bar on the flat side again but just pivot about the width of the bar. Pull the other bar out and position it to pivot again. Release the bar holding it up. Pivot again. Repeat. With any barring technique best to have two people doing it since you are pushing from one spot only and spotters are very helpful too.

                          4. Don't overlook stripping it. If you yank all the buckets out of an MCC a section is almost a one man job. A UPS isn't any djffersnt.

                          5. Do not overlook getting it off the truck/trailer. A lift gate is very nice. But on a lot of jobs we have to rent a Lull or fork truck for 10 minutes of work getting it on/off the truck. One of these days we will get an open trailer and stop doing this.

                          All of these methods require no overhead support and need not involve chain falls or come alongs except maybe maneuvering up or down inclines where they are used as breaks. The load is never more than a few inches off the floor so all the hazards involved in rigging go away. Biggest issue is back strains but I learned from 60 year old mechanics doing it. Work smarter, not harder.

                          We move large motors all the time this way. It's very easy to do. Once it's on a skate/jack one person can move it. It's basically a two man job. At the motor mount sometimes we can slide it on/off or use an engine jack. If there is room we use an overhead trolley or an A frame but on electrical room jobs those are rare. We are lucky when the customer has a working breaker lift in a switchgear room.

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                            #14
                            All of what Paul said.

                            A few months ago, three of us moved a 22,000# lathe about 120' using only skates, bars, a 5# deadblow hammer (for steering), and a forklift (for pulling). Sure, it took a few hours, but it got done. Used a jack and a 4' long 2"x4" steel tube (for leverage) to lift for getting the skates out.

                            Oh, and don't use plywood under machine skates, it'll crush. Use 1/8" plate, with beveled edges if you can.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by mstrlucky74 View Post
                              Have a UPS with separate battery cabinet which will come shipped with batteries in. The cabinet weighs 3,200lbs. Is there anyway you guys know of that this could be moved into elevator and into place without removing batteries? It will fit in elevator and the weight capacity is okay. I just don’t see what could be used to move this. Darn sure not a pallet jack I guess? Hoping not to have to hire rigger.


                              While the suggestions are well and good the criteria that was set aside by OP was not addressed completely.
                              Moving a heavy equipment requires absolute care to avoid damage and injury to personnel and equipment. Hence, there are specialists called riggers.

                              The moving part (ie.) loading, unloading, lifting and spotting the load in place are straightforward.
                              OP mentioned that this equipment is going to be hauled-in (moved) into an elevator.
                              Most commercial medium sized passenger elevators are rated 2500 lbs to 5000 lbs

                              Class A freight elevator is rated almost the same as a passenger elevator.

                              OP did not state the rated capacity of the elevator that he intends to use. . . although he stated it will fit and the weight capacity is OK”.

                              The recommended loading for elevators is limited to 25% of their rated load.

                              So, an equipment weighing 3200 lbs would require a rated 12800 lbs. elevator . It would be a non-standard, custom made elevator.

                              Don’t be fooled with elevator rating thinking your 3200 lbs load can be handled by a 5000 lbs elevator.

                              I had hoisted an MCC /Distribution panel to a rooftop, inside a shed and I had to hire a Sikorsky Helicopter Crane to lift it to the roof and roll it in place.
                              The building elevator wasn’t big enough-- beside the openings were just regular door openings.

                              It cost the company over $6500 for a forty five minute gig. This was twenty years ago.
                              The helicopter was based at an airport about 3 miles from the company grounds.

                              If you haven’t done this before check below link:

                              Better still, as one poster said, hire a rigger.
                              If still in doubt check with your OSHA Checklist. Don't hold me for something I missed.


                              https://www.elevators.com/freight-elevator-classes/

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