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    Damper Connections

    I've always noticed almost all dampers are shown on electrical drawings with a J-Box symbol. They really never require a j-box though. You wired in/out of the actuator.

    #2
    The dampers usually come with an integral box. Not sure why they would indicate a JB on the drawings when you typically do not need another box but you're correct they're almost always drawn that way.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

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      #3
      Originally posted by infinity View Post
      The dampers usually come with an integral box. Not sure why they would indicate a JB on the drawings when you typically do not need another box but you're correct they're almost always drawn that way.
      Like this.

      https://www.grainger.com/product/DAY...re-Smoke-3HGK5

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        #4
        Pretty common to see a hardwired appliance or motor indicated as a j-box on drawings.


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          #5
          Originally posted by brantmacga View Post
          Pretty common to see a hardwired appliance or motor indicated as a j-box on drawings.


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
          Yep...and a lot of times the dampers, VAV's, unit heaters, etc are in EMT runs due to distance or they are on circuits with different voltages....so J-box and whip is common

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            #6
            Originally posted by cdslotz View Post

            Yep...and a lot of times the dampers, VAV's, unit heaters, etc are in EMT runs due to distance or they are on circuits with different voltages....so J-box and whip is common
            not really true for vav and dampers ...many time 8-10 on same circuit.

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              #7
              Originally posted by horsegoer View Post

              not really true for vav and dampers ...many time 8-10 on same circuit.
              I believe that what he's saying is that if you had the branch circuit run in EMT you wouldn't pipe directly into the damper box you would use a junction box with a whip at each. For MC cable it's more likely to just go directly into the damper junction box.
              Rob

              Moderator

              All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by infinity View Post

                I believe that what he's saying is that if you had the branch circuit run in EMT you wouldn't pipe directly into the damper box you would use a junction box with a whip at each. For MC cable it's more likely to just go directly into the damper junction box.
                yes I agree for pipe

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by horsegoer View Post

                  yes I agree for pipe
                  I assumed that your spec limits use of MC to fixture/equipment whips and does not allow MC to be run wild like romex throughout a commercial space.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by cdslotz View Post

                    I assumed that your spec limits use of MC to fixture/equipment whips and does not allow MC to be run wild like romex throughout a commercial space.
                    Not the case. MC is allowed often for all branch wiring in concealed locations of small single phase motors, wiring devices, lighting etc.

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