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    #16
    Originally posted by petersonra
    Just curious, if it was UF and it was buried 22 inches deep instead of the code 24" deep would you be willing to repair it?
    I would repair it and throw 2 more inches of dirt on top.

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      #17
      Originally posted by electricman2
      If that came in a 5/8" version, we could drill our hole for the ground rod and just drop it in.:grin:
      Thanks for my next invention...
      For only $19.95 (batteries not included) you can OWN the handy dandy ground rod hole digger. Save hours of BACKBREAKING labor and be the first person on your block to own one.
      Greg Swartz 8-)
      Colorado Licensed Journeyman Electrician, Master Electrician, Electrical Contractor, and Electrical Engineer!

      USMC 1991-2000 1142/8563

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        #18
        The Real Heart of the Matter...

        Originally posted by petersonra
        Can you really blame him? TheNM has been there for how many years and not been a problem. You want to charge him X thousands of dollars to replace something he sees as being perfectly servicable.

        Its going to be difficult to explain why NM is not not the best choice for burying underground when it has worked for all this time.

        Just curious, if it was UF and it was buried 22 inches deep instead of the code 24" deep would you be willing to repair it?
        I have to think long and hard on that one... I know there are splice kits that are designed for underground use... I've used em. But always on a temporary run. Now you're asking if I'd be willing to do it for a homeowner in a permanent installation.

        The real heart of the matter...
        Am I willing to do something right OR am I willing to do it wrong?

        Is the code book really so black and white that there are no recourses?
        Am I willing to walk away if the customer asks me to take a short-cut?

        Justification for doing it wrong:
        No one will ever get hurt.
        It really is safe.
        There are kits designed for underground use.
        The customer will save money, and maybe use my services again.
        Greg Swartz 8-)
        Colorado Licensed Journeyman Electrician, Master Electrician, Electrical Contractor, and Electrical Engineer!

        USMC 1991-2000 1142/8563

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          #19
          Under the sidewalks?

          I wonder how it would work for getting lines under side walks?

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            #20
            Originally posted by petersonra
            Just curious, if it was UF and it was buried 22 inches deep instead of the code 24" deep would you be willing to repair it?
            Maybe this is my ignorance, but I don't see a problem in the world with that. Given how often I see UG installations that are so shallow they're actually sticking out of the ground, I'm not going to lose sleep if someone else is 2" shallow of code.

            What's the failure rate on those UG splices? They always looked pretty solid to me, and there's nothing saying they can't be beefed up with a few layers of Super 33+.

            I would definitely push for GFCI protection on the line because that's a no-lose situation, but I think even without it that installation is reasonably safe.

            -John

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              #21
              UF yucky caca.

              Originally posted by petersonra
              Can you really blame him? . . . snip . . .

              Just curious, if it was UF and it was buried 22 inches deep instead of the code 24" deep would you be willing to repair it?
              Where in the world have you seen UF burried more than couple of inches? We see the "experts" at the Orange Box telling people to use it for all kinds of crap. And. they never tell them to bury it deep enough.

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