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Who designed this so called Ground Screw and Why?

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    #16
    Originally posted by hbiss View Post

    Perhaps the Happy Sun Fortune Cookie and Ground Screw Company that makes them also has a tool for them.

    -Hal
    Probably not far off of the truth. Assuming these were screws that came ON a device or box, if it was made with an automated screw insertion machine, the hex heads are rounded off so that they go into the magnetic drivers at the end of the vibrating screw feeder. If it results in one fewer missed screw out of every 100 devices, and they run 1million devices in a production batch, that’s a large decrease in scrap and lower cost per unit. It sacrifices the quality of the screw, however that was not part of the goal of the Happy Sun Fortune Cookie and Ground Screw Company who just contracted to make whatever it was as dirt cheap as possible for us penny pinching Americans...

    When you buy the bulk screws separately, they are NOT designed for automated assembly so they work better in the field. I like the “QuaDrive” versions: hex, slotted, Phillis and square drive in one.
    __________________________________________________ ____________________________
    Many people are shocked when they discover I am not a good electrician...

    I'm in California, ergo I am still stuck on the 2014 NEC... We'll get around to the 2017 code in around 2021.

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      #17
      Originally posted by hbiss View Post

      Perhaps the Happy Sun Fortune Cookie and Ground Screw Company that makes them also has a tool for them.

      -Hal
      Many years ago I had to change the oil pressure sensor on my Ford truck. It was threaded into the block, and the housing was keyed to be removed/installed with a 17 sided ratchet socket. The sides were not all the same length, and the housing was so flimsy that trying to turn it with vicegrips would tear it up. And yes, Ford had the socket for sale for at about 4-5X what the sensor cost. You want fries with that?

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        #18
        Originally posted by ggunn View Post

        Many years ago I had to change the oil pressure sensor on my Ford truck. It was threaded into the block, and the housing was keyed to be removed/installed with a 17 sided ratchet socket. The sides were not all the same length, and the housing was so flimsy that trying to turn it with vicegrips would tear it up. And yes, Ford had the socket for sale for at about 4-5X what the sensor cost. You want fries with that?
        My Honda motorcycle had a nut on the clutch assembly with a bizarre geometry like that, I had to buy their special "clutch extraction tool" for it, or take it to someone who had one. I still have it in my toolbox, even though I haven't had that motorcycle in almost 40 years.

        __________________________________________________ ____________________________
        Many people are shocked when they discover I am not a good electrician...

        I'm in California, ergo I am still stuck on the 2014 NEC... We'll get around to the 2017 code in around 2021.

        Comment


          #19
          The unusual shape of the pressure sensor drive surfaces is obviously designed to keep random passers-by from stealing it.

          More seriously, some engine components which affect emissions are required to be tamper resistant. That does not sound applicable here though.

          Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


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            #20
            Originally posted by GoldDigger View Post

            More seriously, some engine components which affect emissions are required to be tamper resistant. That does not sound applicable here though.
            With a 1969 Econoline, not likely.

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              #21
              Probably just cheap junk that does not meet the common standards used by most manufacturers...much like the 8-32 screws that come with many cheap foreign made light fixtures...the threads are often undersized.
              Don, Illinois
              (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

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                #22
                Originally posted by don_resqcapt19 View Post
                Probably just cheap junk that does not meet the common standards used by most manufacturers...much like the 8-32 screws that come with many cheap foreign made light fixtures...the threads are often undersized.
                They aren't 8-32. They're 7.73x31.16.

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                  #23
                  When they installed 'city' water at my house back in NJ, the shutoff valve at the meter had a pentagonal head. As if no one would ever want to shut off their own water!

                  In my collection of mostly unused tools is a rubbery block with an assortment of hex-drive bits-- most have hollow tips (for those sockets with a post up the middle). Some are hex, some are star, some are 2-prong, some are 3-prong. The IT department at work used one of them once to open a PC that was 'secured' with a post-up-the-middle fastener.

                  "If you don't have the right tool, you're obviously not qualified to look inside!"

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by 480sparky View Post

                    They aren't 8-32. They're 7.73x31.16.
                    If so they can't be used with our boxes as they are 8-32 and the screws are required to match the threads in our boxes.
                    Don, Illinois
                    (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

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                      #25


                      Originally posted by PaulMmn View Post
                      When they installed 'city' water at my house back in NJ, the shutoff valve at the meter had a pentagonal head. As if no one would ever want to shut off their own water!
                      ....
                      ....

                      "If you don't have the right tool, you're obviously not qualified to look inside!"
                      It actually makes sense. If they turn off the water for non-payment they do not want you to be able to turn it back on.

                      And if you can turn off "their" valve you can also bypass the meter.

                      In some areas it is customary to have the utility valve just upstream of the meter and a customer valve (ordinary handle) just downstream.

                      Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk


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                        #26
                        We don't concern ourselves with that here. The cost of water is a mere pittance compared to what they make us pay in taxes and utilities, so I guess they figure nobody cares enough not to pay their water bill. Ordinary gate valve where the water line enters through the wall. Turn it off or on as you will. It's before the meter and we have had meters leak or the bottoms blow off. So it's nice top be able to shut the supply off in the middle of the night if something like that should happen. There is an outside curb valve too but you can get a key for that at Home Depot. Yeah, they probably would get pissy if you turned it back on after they shut you off. But I have never heard of anybody getting turned off for non-payment.

                        -Hal

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by hbiss View Post
                          Ordinary gate valve where the water line enters through the wall.
                          We too have a gate valve just inside the house and before the meter. But the utility also has a penta-head vavle underground just off of their main line, his is where you would get disconnected.
                          Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

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                            #28
                            It was good for its intended purpose; that being selling to the low bidder.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Jraef View Post
                              It sacrifices the quality of the screw, however that was not part of the goal of the Happy Sun Fortune Cookie and Ground Screw Company who just contracted to make whatever it was as dirt cheap as possible for us penny pinching Americans...
                              and that, wraps up all the stuff coming over in bins.
                              ~New signature under construction.~
                              ~~~~Please excuse the mess.~~~~

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                                #30
                                Years ago I worked for an equipment mfr. We were having our NEMA 12 MV gear enclosures made here in the US, but the owner of the company got some samples made in China because he could buy them there, pay for the shipping to Florida, and still pay 1/2 as much. So he tasked me with looking at the quality. They were crap, but he was still convinced that nobody would notice. I knew an old trick I learned at Hoffman and had him get inside of the box with me (they were big), then closed the door. We could see light at most of the corners and door gasket! NEMA 12 my butt...

                                Called the Chinese from his office and they said "What means MENA 12?"

                                There's your sign...
                                __________________________________________________ ____________________________
                                Many people are shocked when they discover I am not a good electrician...

                                I'm in California, ergo I am still stuck on the 2014 NEC... We'll get around to the 2017 code in around 2021.

                                Comment

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