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    Best Equipment for PLC

    If one were to learn PLC logic what would be he best equipment to learn- ie, the most popular I guess...What would that be and where would you go to learn it.
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky

    #2
    Someone can get started with basics fairly easily now. I started with AB because that was the only one represented in this area. Expensive product at the time, Expensive support. Now basic systems are available including a PLC, HMI, and free software for both for well under $1K. Online help via YouTube is available.

    I took night classes at tech schools and every control project became a PLC project including a couple Xmas carols set to controlling lights.

    I am still a rank amateur, but have managed the small projects I’ve done.

    There is a week long school in Georgia I would love to attend. Automation direct has an online forum as well as PLCS.net. I’m sure there are multiple others.
    Last edited by ptonsparky; 05-07-19, 02:17 PM.
    Tom
    TBLO

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      #3
      I am not really looking to get into PLC. I just thought since I got this forum off the ground I would start a thread for those interested.

      I hear that it pays good money. Anyone have an idea what a worker can make doing PLC.

      Btw, my son is teaching PLC at Asheville Community College in NC. He has tried teaches me bits but I am too unfocused to learn.
      They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
      She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
      I can't help it if I'm lucky

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
        I am not really looking to get into PLC. I just thought since I got this forum off the ground I would start a thread for those interested.

        I hear that it pays good money. Anyone have an idea what a worker can make doing PLC.

        Btw, my son is teaching PLC at Asheville Community College in NC. He has tried teaches me bits but I am too unfocused to learn.
        What do they use for equipment?
        Tom
        TBLO

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          #5
          I think they are using AB but not certain
          They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
          She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
          I can't help it if I'm lucky

          Comment


            #6
            So is the language different for different brands or is the logic the same
            They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
            She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
            I can't help it if I'm lucky

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
              So is the language different for different brands or is the logic the same
              I've only done ladder logic for older AB, and ADs CLICK. I may have tried a couple others. The terms are different but the logic of how things operate were similar. Totally different levels of sophistication and capabilities for these two units.
              Tom
              TBLO

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by ptonsparky View Post
                I've only done ladder logic for older AB, and ADs CLICK. I may have tried a couple others. The terms are different but the logic of how things operate were similar. Totally different levels of sophistication and capabilities for these two units.

                My son just replied and said they are updating the pic lab and teaching Click in the intro class and AB and Siemens in the advanced class.
                They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
                She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
                I can't help it if I'm lucky

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
                  My son just replied and said they are updating the pic lab and teaching Click in the intro class and AB and Siemens in the advanced class.
                  Tom
                  TBLO

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Best PLC to learn

                    I purchased a used Allen Bradley MicroLogix 1000 from EBAY for $50.00 a about 10 years ago. You can get a free download of RS Lynx Lite & Micrologix Light from the Allen Bradley website. I hooked the 1000 up to some switches to simulate inputs and some LED's for the outputs. Spent a lot of time playing with it and later moved up to the bigger AB products at work.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
                      If one were to learn PLC logic what would be he best equipment to learn- ie, the most popular I guess...What would that be and where would you go to learn it.
                      AB. it's still the de facto standard in industrial control PLC's, because of the manufacturer support.
                      overpriced, until you have a process line down, and can't get support or parts.

                      RLL, relay ladder logic, is still the backbone of this, as electricians can follow it.

                      dynamic logic is coils operating switches, and switches operating coils.

                      RLL is each rung in the ladder is a true/false statement. true is 1. false is 0.
                      the beauty is that it's a logic statement, not a continuity path. no isolating
                      inputs, or backfeeds.

                      and, or, not, memory, delay, and registers covers an awful lot of what you'll use it for.

                      as was said, you can buy a cheap plc, and some software, and largely teach
                      yourself.
                      ~New signature under construction.~
                      ~~~~Please excuse the mess.~~~~

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                        #12
                        We have equipment that uses GE Fanuc hardware, automation direct hardware and AB. I've been doing all of our PLC work for years with the exception of AB which was all at one particular location and contracted out. I learned on AD, later got into GE and just now getting into AB.

                        If you want to learn on the side, the Do-More line from automation direct is great because the software is free and includes a simulator on your PC. Allen-Bradley is where the money is I would think though. I hated GE to start with but am really found of their new stuff.

                        Funny, the guy that did all of our AB work quit from the contractor he worked for. He was trusted to maintain all of the documentation and programs on the work he did because nobody on our end understood any of it. We got a letter from his boss saying, "sorry, we don't have anyone else that can help you. We also can't provide any documentation on the work previously done either. Good luck."
                        Deserve's got nothin' to do with it.

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                          #13
                          Brand names aside, generally ladder logic is ladder logic. It's the other stuff that varies in level of complication from one line to another. Communications, handling of numbers, instructions set such as math functions, etc.
                          Deserve's got nothin' to do with it.

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                            #14
                            All PLC programming can be thought of as basically similar, so it's true that if you learn one, you can pick up another one. But A-B has about a 60% market share for PLCs in North America at end users. Siemens is #2 with around 19%, then Schneider (Sq. D) at 5%; all others are less than that. That's why a lot of people learn A-B PLCs, because basically no matter where you go, you can get work. I cut my teeth on A-B 40 years ago, my skill set is still somewhat relevant. I had a job for a while that was 100% Siemens up until about 8 years ago and did fine while I was there but I had to "re-learn" everything I thought I knew. Since then I lost track of it until last month when I had to help someone and couldn't even navigate in Step 7 software any more. Yet when I walk up to an A-B system that I have never seen, I know where I am because even after 40 years, much of the operating structure and idiosyncrasies are the same.

                            Having been an electrician, then PLC guy, then Engineer, I can attest to the fact that I made more money (because of OT) as an electrician than as a PLC programmer. BUT, I was in a nice air conditioned office, got to go home at the end of the day without stinking when I got there, and I was never laid off as a PLC programmer (whereas I have been laid off as an electrician and as an engineer). I just found it a bit too dull for my taste.
                            __________________________________________________ ____________________________
                            Many people are shocked when they discover I am not a good electrician...

                            I'm in California, ergo I am still stuck on the 2014 NEC... We'll get around to the 2017 code in around 2021.

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                              #15
                              I’ve never found it dull. Stressful as all get out, but maybe that’s more in figuring out how everything is supposed to work together to begin with.
                              Tom
                              TBLO

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