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sp st momentary contact that looks like sp

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    #16
    190417-2410 EDT

    wyreman:

    Your first and subsequent posts are totally incomprehensible.

    1. How many incoming circuits come to this switch? If just one, then it is a single pole switch.

    2. For each input pole how many different output paths are there? Might be described as to how many throws. A rotary selector switch can have many positions. For example a single pole four output selector with 16 input mechanical positions and binary coded output.

    3. How many mechanical input states are there? For example exerted and not-exerted. An ordinary mechanical SPST toggle switch would have two stable mechanical input positions, on and off. A simple pushbutton single pole switch might be normally open, push to close, and spring return to open. Another type of pushbutton might produce a short time closure on pushing, but after the time delay opens even while the button is still pressed, and is spring returned to reset to operate again after release of the button.

    You have to define how many poles are required and what mechanical to electrical function is to be performed. Start by defining how this entire circuit is to work with respect to time, mechanical inputs, and electrical outputs.

    Break it down into simple time sequence functions.

    .

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by gar
      wyreman:

      Your first and subsequent posts are totally incomprehensible.
      Yeeeeup!

      He needs to study up on switch nomenclature.

      -Hal

      Comment


        #18
        Disposal

        I have an LED control board that is listening for
        momentary pulses of 110 VAc current.
        The control board has a second source of 110v
        going directly to an attached LED driver

        Circuitboard is programmed to pass through the
        24vdc from LED driver
        Outputting different patterns of 24vdc
        depending on the number of pulses received.
        For example one pulse of more than two seconds
        might give you dimming
        release the contact and then reapply
        the similar pulse more than two seconds
        would give you brightness.
        Three pulses might give you the top middle bottom strands
        Being energized
        four pulses might alternate through different patterns
        six pulses might change the program.

        The circuitboard is looking for pulses and modulates
        the output of the independent LED driver.
        depending on the quantity and duration of
        the momentary control voltage pulses


        When the control board receives a pulse
        That has a corresponding program
        it
        Sends the
        outputs from the driver to attached LED Strands
        These LED strands then produce various types Of
        twinkles and shimmies
        Believe that’s the correct technical term

        It doesn’t really matter
        https://vimeo.com/226425194

        because my question was much simpler
        and that is I believe
        Somebody has installed a
        2p momentary contact switch w center off

        When
        a disposal switch.
        Would make signaling for the untrained user
        much simpler

        I just didn’t know there was a simple disposal switch
        Avail which was specified but not installed

        Thanks for your help.
        "A problem clearly stated is a problem half solved."

        Comment


          #19
          Why do I have to go searching for the spec sheet? https://image.ylighting.com/is/conte...161751_specpdf

          Looks like they are calling for an on-off SPST switch and a momentary NO push button. They have them separate on a single plate. 4 conductors from the fixture.

          I don't know how you would do that with a single switch.

          -Hal

          Comment


            #20
            190418-2359 EDT

            wyreman:

            Your motto is "A problem clearly stated is a problem half solved."
            Why did you not follow it? You could have easily solved your problem without ever asking the forum.

            .

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by hbiss View Post
              Why do I have to go searching for the spec sheet? https://image.ylighting.com/is/conte...161751_specpdf

              Looks like they are calling for an on-off SPST switch and a momentary NO push button. They have them separate on a single plate. 4 conductors from the fixture.

              I don't know how you would do that with a single switch.

              -Hal
              YOu don't, but could still do it with two separate switches.
              I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by wyreman View Post

                because my question was much simpler
                and that is I believe
                Somebody has installed a
                2p momentary contact switch w center off

                Never seen such a thing in a Decora style switch, but that doesn't mean there isn't one out there either, but if so simple fix is to tie the two outputs together then no matter which way you push the switch, you get same output signal and it sort of functions same as a spring return push button would.
                I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

                Comment


                  #23
                  I have a small HMI and PLC that would work well. Touch the Scene you want and walk away. Probably a phone app out there some place.
                  Tom
                  TBLO

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by kwired View Post
                    YOu don't, but could still do it with two separate switches.
                    Well, yeah. Isn't that what I said?

                    Originally posted by kwired View Post
                    Never seen such a thing in a Decora style switch, but that doesn't mean there isn't one out there either, but if so simple fix is to tie the two outputs together then no matter which way you push the switch, you get same output signal and it sort of functions same as a spring return push button would.
                    It seems to me that the fixture, at $2800, would come with the control switches and plate.

                    -Hal

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by hbiss View Post
                      Why do I have to go searching for the spec sheet? https://image.ylighting.com/is/conte...161751_specpdf

                      Looks like they are calling for an on-off SPST switch and a momentary NO push button. They have them separate on a single plate. 4 conductors from the fixture.

                      I don't know how you would do that with a single switch.

                      -Hal
                      I have an X10 switch that combines on/off and dimming in a single button. Push-on/Push-off. Push & hold to dim or brighten.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by PaulMmn View Post
                        I have an X10 switch that combines on/off and dimming in a single button. Push-on/Push-off. Push & hold to dim or brighten.
                        That's not two switches. It's a dimmer.

                        -Hal

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by PaulMmn View Post
                          I have an X10 switch that combines on/off and dimming in a single button. Push-on/Push-off. Push & hold to dim or brighten.
                          Originally posted by hbiss View Post
                          That's not two switches. It's a dimmer.

                          -Hal
                          Going a little deeper in technicalities, it has some sort of mini processor inside, that switch is just an input device to the whole assembly. It is programmed to do different things depending on duration of the input signal. The switch mechanism itself doesn't directly switch the output of the assembly like it does for the switches that are the main topic of this conversation are typically used.
                          I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by kwired
                            Going a little deeper in technicalities, it has some sort of mini processor inside, that switch is just an input device to the whole assembly. It is programmed to do different things depending on duration of the input signal. The switch mechanism itself doesn't directly switch the output of the assembly like it does for the switches that are the main topic of this conversation are typically used.
                            Actually this operates the same way except that the switches are remote from the fixture and the fixture contains the mini-processor. I believe the switches are LV. They control the mini-processor through 4 conductors. Line voltage is run directly to the fixture.

                            -Hal

                            Comment


                              #29
                              190420-1943 EDT

                              If low voltage logic signals are being switched, then ordinary switch contacts for 120 V can be a poor choice.

                              .

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Another good point to consider.

                                -Hal

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