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480VAC transformer used at 380VAC

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    480VAC transformer used at 380VAC

    Hi

    Is it OK to use a 480/600VAC transformer to convert 380VAC to 480VAC ? The ratio is almost the same, is the transformer will react the same will lower voltage on the primary side ?
    Thanks,
    Hugo

    #2
    Originally posted by hublanc View Post
    Hi

    Is it OK to use a 480/600VAC transformer to convert 380VAC to 480VAC ? The ratio is almost the same, is the transformer will react the same will lower voltage on the primary side ?
    Thanks,
    Hugo
    Who manufactured the transformer? Did you call the transformer manufacturer? Can you post a picture of the name plate which should show the taps and connections? What is the KVA?
    With the very limited information that you have provide which was limited it the pri and sec voltage ration of the transformer in question it is almost if you are asking a question to get the answer that you want to hear which would be yes. BUT I would be reluctant to give an answer because there may be something that would say the contrary.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by hublanc View Post
      Hi

      Is it OK to use a 480/600VAC transformer to convert 380VAC to 480VAC ? The ratio is almost the same, is the transformer will react the same will lower voltage on the primary side ?
      Thanks,
      Hugo
      1)The output voltage would be less a bit.
      2)The transformer capacity would reduce by almost 20%

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by hublanc View Post
        Hi

        Is it OK to use a 480/600VAC transformer to convert 380VAC to 480VAC ? The ratio is almost the same, is the transformer will react the same will lower voltage on the primary side ?
        Thanks,
        Hugo
        Is it all 60 Hz? Some transformers don't care much 50/60 Hz, others may. Best bet is to look at the nameplate and see what it says or just call the manufacturer and ask.
        Bob

        Comment


          #5
          151015-0739 EDT

          hublanc:

          If frequency is the same, then any transformer can be operated at any voltage below its rating. But you must stay within the current ratings of the windings. Also with some core materials (not standard transformer iron) there may be some performance problems at very low voltages. There is no heating problem at low voltage if you stay within the current ratings of the windings.

          If the frequency is different, then maximum continuous input voltage is (original rated voltage) * (new frequency)/(rated frequency). So as frequency goes down so must the voltage.

          Basically the maximum volt-time integral has to be constant to prevent severe saturation of the core. Most transformers are designed to go somewhat into saturation each cycle. This is to achieve maximum power capability with the minimum amount of iron and copper.

          Volt-time integral is the summation of all the short time (volt)*(small time increment) values per cycle.

          If you go higher in frequency than the rated frequency, then other factors create limitations.

          .

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