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    National Electrical Code

    1) Where can I find in the National Electrical Code the distance between lighting switches and showers?

    2) Where can I find in the National Electrical Code if the lighting circuit in the bathroom shall be protected by a ground fault circuit interrupter breaker?

    Thank you very much!

    #2
    1) Not specified by NEC.

    2) Not specified by NEC, but may be a listing requirement of some vent/light units. Check manufacturers instructions.

    Comment


      #3
      Peter is correct, neither is directly specified in the NEC, 210.8 and 404.4 are the relevant code sections. Only bathroom recpts are required to be GFCI protected and you can't put a switch inside the shower but you can get as close as possible and still be code compliant.
      If Billy Idol is on your playlist go reevaluate your life.

      Comment


        #4
        The only time gfci is needed for lighting is when the manufacturer states so when used over a shower. Very few manufacturers req. that.... Fans installed over a shower are required to be gfci protected but that is a manufacturer's installation requirement, not an NEC code.
        They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
        She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
        I can't help it if I'm lucky

        Comment


          #5
          I agree with the others. A graphic from Mike, although it's old it is still applicable:

          Rob

          Moderator

          All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

          Comment


            #6
            Switch in Shower

            Wouldn't a switch be permitted in a shower if it was part of a listed assembly as part of a shower unit,etc? It's not that all switches are not permitted, just those that are not part of a listed assembly. Am I way off in my thinking?

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by tw1156 View Post
              Wouldn't a switch be permitted in a shower if it was part of a listed assembly as part of a shower unit,etc? It's not that all switches are not permitted, just those that are not part of a listed assembly. Am I way off in my thinking?
              Yes that would be part of the current code language.

              404.4 Damp or Wet Locations. A surface-mounted switch
              or circuit breaker in a damp or wet location shall be en-
              closed in a weatherproof enclosure or cabinet that shall
              comply with 312.2. A flush-mounted switch or circuit
              breaker in a damp or wet location shall be equipped with a
              weatherproof cover. Switches shall not be installed within
              wet locations in tub or shower spaces unless installed as
              part of a listed tub or shower assembly.
              Rob

              Moderator

              All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
                The only time gfci is needed for lighting is when the manufacturer states so when used over a shower. Very few manufacturers req. that.... Fans installed over a shower are required to be gfci protected but that is a manufacturer's installation requirement, not an NEC code.
                110.3(B) is the code that makes mfg req's part of the NEC.
                Electricians do it until it Hertz!

                Comment


                  #9
                  In my experience, combination lights/fans/heaters for use in showers are pretty much certain to require GFCI if they include a heating element. Not so certain, but common, for other combinations.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by JFletcher View Post
                    110.3(B) is the code that makes mfg req's part of the NEC.
                    True, but as Dennis stated the NEC does not directly require it.
                    Rob

                    Moderator

                    All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

                    Comment


                      #11
                      My experience with putting lights in bathroom on GFI is if the GFI tripped then of course your lights would go out.

                      Sent from my MotoE2(4G-LTE) using Tapatalk

                      Comment

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