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    #31
    Originally posted by Tony S View Post
    Just to cheer you all up, a UK bowl of spaghetti that is supposed to be a patient call system.

    [ATTACH=CONFIG]22567[/ATTACH]
    I#d be censored and censured on here for what I think of that mess.

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      #32
      Originally posted by ggunn View Post
      But of course the AHJ can refuse to pass you on the inspection and catch you between him and the customer.
      Wouldn't matter to me, when the work that has been agreed to is completed I will bill the customer, they can take the rest up with the AHJ and have me do the corrections or hire another EC.

      Roger
      Moderator

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        #33
        Right now, as i type this, my (newly installed AHJ) has informed me of all the open permits i have.

        I've responded i'm availble at his convenience ,and will make every effort to provide entry as liasion to those jobs i've done.

        I am ,and remain, ever accomodating....

        Many of these are slums , all white trash

        When i do walk him through, he's going to see things most of you post in this forum as rather 'objectionable'

        IE~what i did 'touch' will probably pass, what 'exists' wil not

        My AHJ will then 'write it up' , and forward this to the property owner, with my blessings, in fact i'm more than happy to point much of it out so that he do so

        What will happen next is either total ignorace of said directive, or negotiations for estimates towards compliance.

        My question to this forums biz entities that are not some sort of philanthropy is, why would one be involved in anything less than what's in your back pocket?

        ~RJ~

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          #34
          So what did you end up doing fix it or close it, or walk away?

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            #35
            Originally posted by gadfly56 View Post
            Compliance, however, is technically the responsibility of the tenant/owner, not the EC. The contractor is just the tenant/owner's agent to achieve compliance. The AHJ can certainly withhold approval, but I don't see how he can force the EC to do anything for which there is no contract.
            Are EI's the contract police or just code enforcement and other jurisdiction rules enforcement?

            It is my opinion you can have a contract that clearly spells out a lot of code violations and that shouldn't matter one bit to the inspector, he is to inspect to the code that is adopted as the law in the jurisdiction.

            Some jurisdictions the owner is the one that files permits - those cases the corrections are technically between the owner and AHJ, but the contractor is owners agent. Other places the contractor is the one that must file permits. Responsibility of code compliance is easy to determine on new projects because it all is new. It gets more complex when dealing with existing violations before work ever started and there isn't one answer fits all for those circumstances. A good contractor sees those problems and addresses them early on instead of "wait and see what the inspector says when we are all done". Some relatively minor things they may do the wait and see thing, other times they may just correct them, knowing a reinspection fee or other issues may cost more than just fixing it does.
            I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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              #36
              Originally posted by kwired View Post
              Are EI's the contract police or just code enforcement and other jurisdiction rules enforcement?

              It is my opinion you can have a contract that clearly spells out a lot of code violations and that shouldn't matter one bit to the inspector, he is to inspect to the code that is adopted as the law in the jurisdiction.

              Some jurisdictions the owner is the one that files permits - those cases the corrections are technically between the owner and AHJ, but the contractor is owners agent. Other places the contractor is the one that must file permits. Responsibility of code compliance is easy to determine on new projects because it all is new. It gets more complex when dealing with existing violations before work ever started and there isn't one answer fits all for those circumstances. A good contractor sees those problems and addresses them early on instead of "wait and see what the inspector says when we are all done". Some relatively minor things they may do the wait and see thing, other times they may just correct them, knowing a reinspection fee or other issues may cost more than just fixing it does.
              Maybe all that nonsense applies to you but not most. If I'm asked to contract a detached building I'll write up a scope of work and that's what I will be responsible for. Any existing problems found by an inspector inside the building where the detached building is going to be fed from can be written up and given to the owner, they can address them. That was just an example, you can change it to any scenario you want

              For existing buildings I will also note in the contract wording that existing deficiencies or unseen problems can be addressed as extras.

              Roger
              Moderator

              Comment


                #37
                Originally posted by JB1964 View Post
                I'm not poor nor am I new at this game.( 30 years exp ) And I have seen worse than this quite often . I just wanted opinions not smart a__ remarks thank you .
                Calm down friend, smiling is one of the forum natures, you're in the world very technical forum in electrical engineering
                "Sleem"

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