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Dryer plug, 4 prong.

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    #16
    The appliance bonding jumper can be confusing. We just converted a 4-wire-equipped dryer to 3-wire to suit the existing receptacle in an older home just purchased.

    The dryer had an unconnected white wire in the compartment, so I landed it on the cabinet. Had it been green, I would have landed it on the neutral terminal instead.
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

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      #17
      Originally posted by LarryFine View Post
      The appliance bonding jumper can be confusing. We just converted a 4-wire-equipped dryer to 3-wire to suit the existing receptacle in an older home just purchased.

      The dryer had an unconnected white wire in the compartment, so I landed it on the cabinet. Had it been green, I would have landed it on the neutral terminal instead.
      Older units always had a metal strap for a bonding jumper and was obvious, ranges typically still use a strap.

      If not so clear I always check for continuity from frame to neutral terminal to be sure.
      I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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        #18
        Ok. 250.140 exception looks like the best option. Thanks again.

        Sent from my Moto G (4) using Tapatalk

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          #19
          Yes, with rare exception, the correct procedure is to install the cord that matches the existing circuit and receptacle.
          Master Electrician
          Electrical Contractor
          Richmond, VA

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            #20
            Originally posted by LarryFine View Post
            Yes, with rare exception, the correct procedure is to install the cord that matches the existing circuit and receptacle.
            What I would do, even if the house were built in 2010 and had three wire receptacle, unless there were gross negligence in wiring installation that says more troubles than just 3 vs 4 wire receptacle are present.
            I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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              #21
              Installing the correct cord on the dryer is still "doing it right." Just do THAT "right" by installing the bonding jumper.

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                #22
                Originally posted by jeff48356 View Post
                It looks like you'll need to rewire the circuit with #10-3 Romex cable. And if it was built in 1996, I'm surprised it doesn't already have 4-wire, since the requirement for 4-wire ranges and dryers went into effect in 1994.
                Not every structure built was wired to the 'current' code of the day. Some AHJs are 10-20 years behind in code cycles. If there was any code being enforced at all at the time.

                And it's not always the NEC. Threre's plenty of home-grown codes to go around.

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                  #23
                  While the best option is a new 4-wire circuit, the existing is code compliant so another option is convert the dryer to 3-wire, I did not read most of the other posts, never really liked 3-wire receptacles, but they are still OK as existing.

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by ptonsparky View Post
                    Yes, suggest, but don’t loose sleep over the three wire.
                    I have a 3 wire dryer circuit in my house and my level of concern is 0 - 10. I have far more important issues to worry over.
                    Yes, I'll be happy to do a first class job for less than anyone else and take a dollar a week for 10 years.

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                      #25
                      I would put a 3-wire cord on it and call it a day. It's an existing installation.

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