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    #16
    Originally posted by ptonsparky View Post
    Building 1 is fed from a pad mount 480v wye. It has three service entrances. Two with GF protection, rods & bonded building steel for GES at each location. I installed the third & it has a ufer with steel bonded. 480 to 120/208 step downs at 5 locations, IIRC.

    The office is a fed 120/240 from a pole top transformer. Ufer. No connection to building 1 other than what the tech guys did for communications and data. No common water line and they are nonmetallic.

    eta: The two transformers may be fed from the same primary, if I were to hazard a guess, I’d say they are.
    Ok, but the OP question was around using fiber, for a "will that help" in preventing lightning from traveling from one bldg to another? So I not sure what the power info is for?

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      #17
      Originally posted by FionaZuppa View Post
      Well, we would certainly like to see what any of the conduit in the ground looks like.
      Do the buildings share the same EGC from service?
      Originally posted by FionaZuppa View Post
      Ok, but the OP question was around using fiber, for a "will that help" in preventing lightning from traveling from one bldg to another? So I not sure what the power info is for?
      To answer as fully as I can that there is no other connection of any kind between the buildings other than the cat 5 and phone lines.
      Tom
      TBLO

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        #18
        Originally posted by FionaZuppa View Post
        1st off, plastic is a conductor, it's just a poor conductor, until you apply a few million volts. I could never understand why schools teach "inverse of conductor = insulator", make no sense.
        It does make sense. It's a one dimensional continuum with "conductor" a vector in one direction and "insulator" a vector in the other. One is the inverse of the other.

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          #19
          Originally posted by ggunn View Post
          It does make sense. It's a one dimensional continuum with "conductor" a vector in one direction and "insulator" a vector in the other. One is the inverse of the other.
          Nah. The good conductor vector (in ohms units) is just way smaller in magnitude than the poor conductor. If physically stacked they will always add to each other, thus the vectors can never be 180o apart (true subtraction), they are in fact always 0o apart (true add).

          Everything is a conductor, no escaping the physics there.

          What about 2vdc across 8.98 x 1012 ohms? You still have conductance, yes?

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