Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Raintight fittings

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Raintight fittings

    I was thinking the other day, if a raceway outside is considered a wet location by default and the conductors are rated for wet, why is there a need for raintight fittings vs regular compression fittings? We also know that condensation will occur inside the conduit so I feel I must be missing something.

    #2
    Originally posted by jimport View Post
    I was thinking the other day, if a raceway outside is considered a wet location by default and the conductors are rated for wet, why is there a need for raintight fittings vs regular compression fittings? We also know that condensation will occur inside the conduit so I feel I must be missing something.
    You are not missing anything. It is dumb. As you note, the conductors are already required to be wet rated, plus we have 230.3, 225.22, 314.15, and 312.2. Also, raintight fittings are not manufactured with sufficient quality or tolerances to actually be raintight.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

    Comment


      #3
      I think it's a matter of minimizing the water. Moisture in an enclosure is one thing, being filled with water is another. Arranged to drain is important, too.

      I usually drill two 1/8" holes in the bottom of WP boxes, LBs, etc.where normally sealed.
      Master Electrician
      Electrical Contractor
      Richmond, VA

      Comment


        #4
        If you rely on those connectors with rubber rings to keep rain out for more than a year...
        Drill weep holes and arrange to drain.
        Tom
        TBLO

        Comment


          #5
          They do manufacture drain fittings

          https://www.usesi.com/crouse-hinds-c...-4-inch-252254

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by jimport View Post
            I was thinking the other day, if a raceway outside is considered a wet location by default and the conductors are rated for wet, why is there a need for raintight fittings vs regular compression fittings? We also know that condensation will occur inside the conduit so I feel I must be missing something.
            Good question, I would guess that this falls in line with the NEC moving towards what someone thinks is a good idea versus a substantiated need for something like rain-tight fittings. Rain-tight probably allow less water infiltration but they still do not keep it all out so what's the point. Setting the installation up so that it properly drains is more important than the flimsy rubber ring on these fittings.
            Rob

            Moderator

            All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

            Comment


              #7
              The ones I was using had a 1/16" metal ring with a slight shoulder in addition to the concrete tight compression ring.

              Comment


                #8
                It goes like this..... If you have something you want to sell all you have to do is make friends with someone on one of the CMPs and convince him or her that what you have needs to be required by code. "Sounds like a good idea to me", says Mr. CMP member, "Besides, it's not costing me anything". Next thing you know you have an instant market for your product.

                It sounds like I'm being sarcastic but I'm not. It really does go down this way.
                If Billy Idol is on your playlist go reevaluate your life.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by jusme123 View Post
                  Yeah. Wish they were cheaper and my supply house carried them. Can you blame me for just drilling a weep hole in the bottom of the LB that enters the outside wall?

                  Comment


                    #10
                    For what it's worth, in Mexico every EMT fitting I saw outdoors was set screw. They seem to be surviving, although I saw other stuff there that made me truly worry.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      A local ec in Chapel Hill, NC got turned down for using compression fittings on the ceiling of a screened in porch. I could not find anything saying they were rated for damp location. The call, IMO, was a bs one. Does this guy really thing water was going to get in thru the compression fitting? Sometimes we have to use our brains and put the book down. I really try and do things correctly but that call was unwarranted but perhaps correct according to the wording in the NEC
                      They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
                      She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
                      I can't help it if I'm lucky

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I think the whole idea of raintight fittings is silly.
                        They don’t work, joints leak, and as said above, everything is wet rated.
                        Someone here honestly tell me he has pulled out wire from a below ground pipe (that wasn’t coil HDPE) that was completely dry after two or three years.
                        as also stated above, manufacturers come up with another bull crap product and convince a CMP member to support their proposal.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Hv&Lv View Post
                          Someone here honestly tell me he has pulled out wire from a below ground pipe (that wasn’t coil HDPE) that was completely dry after two or three years.
                          I would be surprised to find dry wires after two or three weeks.
                          Master Electrician
                          Electrical Contractor
                          Richmond, VA

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X