Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Size of Heat Pump in Tons

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Size of Heat Pump in Tons

    I have a Payne Heat pump and would like to know how many "tons" capacity it is. its a
    Product PH12NA036000ABAA
    Model PH12NA036-B

    About ten years old and I have the manual but not sure what to look for
    Moderator-Washington State
    Ancora Imparo

    #2
    Look for the cooling capacity in BTU per hour. 12000 BTU per hour is 1 ton of cooling.

    At a guess I'd say the unit is 36000 BTU per hour and thus 3 tons of cooling, just from the model number, not from any real knowledge.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by winnie View Post
      Look for the cooling capacity in BTU per hour. 12000 BTU per hour is 1 ton of cooling.

      At a guess I'd say the unit is 36000 BTU per hour and thus 3 tons of cooling, just from the model number, not from any real knowledge.
      My thoughts too. The 036 in the Model No. is a clue
      John, Chair City, NC
      Technology: Mans best efforts to make things as good as they used to be

      Comment


        #4
        Actually, somewhat dependent on indoor unit. Generally 34,200 BTU cooling and 36,000 BTU heating (high temp mode). Divide BTU/12,000 to convert to tons. Link to specs on unit below.

        https://dms.hvacpartners.com/docs/10...SS-PH12-07.pdf

        Comment


          #5
          Last week wired up an 18,000 BTU mini-split and it only weighed about 300 pounds

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by tom baker View Post
            I have a Payne Heat pump and would like to know how many "tons" capacity it is. its a
            Product PH12NA036000ABAA
            Model PH12NA036-B

            About ten years old and I have the manual but not sure what to look for
            Please search the web using the model #. My search yielded 34,400 BTUh rating (036-B) or a TC of 2.87 tons. Here.
            Last edited by topgone; 11-08-19, 07:25 PM. Reason: wrong figures

            Comment


              #7
              Whether the actual is 34,400 BTU or 36000 BTU, it's all still considered a 3-ton system, and the model number will almost always have a "036" in it somewhere.

              Below 2-tons, you'll usually just see the BTUs listed, and these would typically be window or mini-split systems. After those, the residential world is divided into tonnage as 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, and 5. Multiply by 12 and that's the number you'll usually find in the model number.

              Comment


                #8
                Just noticed than no one yet explained the obvious to OP (if not already known by him), that the 12,000 BTU/hr is the heat that needs to be removed from water to make a ton of ICE.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by junkhound View Post
                  Last week wired up an 18,000 BTU mini-split and it only weighed about 300 pounds
                  Short pounds or long pounds?

                  Originally posted by junkhound View Post
                  ... 12,000 BTU/hr is the heat that needs to be removed from water to make a ton of ICE.
                  Um, no. "12,000 BTU/hour" isn't even a measure of heat; it's a measure of power. The amount of heat that needs to be removed from a ton of water to turn it into ice is closer to 300 kBTU than twelve. And it's BTU, not BTU per hour.

                  About a century and a half ago, in the early days of mechanical refrigeration, icehouse operators asked refrigeration salesmen, "What'll this do for me?" Their response: "This machine will provide the same cooling effect as consuming a ton of ice every day." And the refrigeration ton was born.

                  But we no longer use icehouses. It would be a good thing if we also quit using refrigeration tons.
                  (HVACR engineers are among the slowest to adopt new ideas ... if something introduced in 1799 can still be considered "new". Many of them still use Roman Numeral prefixes.)

                  <rant>
                  One more example of a good reason to ditch the British system of weights & measures and use metric.

                  In the metric system, there are only seven base units to learn and just ONE unit of refrigeration capacity, the Watt, (or kilowatt, megawatt, et at.) No confusion and no need for unit conversion.
                  (there's also ONE unit of efficiency, the dimensionless ε -- no need to fart around with EER, SEER, COP or kW/ton)

                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intern...ystem_of_Units
                  </rant>
                  Last edited by drcampbell; 11-10-19, 10:32 AM.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I don't understand how an engine is rated in Kw.
                    Master Electrician
                    Electrical Contractor
                    Richmond, VA

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by LarryFine View Post
                      I don't understand how an engine is rated in Kw.
                      Multiply torque (in kiloNewton-meters) by speed. (in radians per second) The result is the engine's power output in kilowatts.

                      The Watt is a measure of power. All flavors of power, not merely electric power.
                      Last edited by drcampbell; 11-10-19, 10:33 AM.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by drcampbell View Post
                        Short pounds or long pounds?


                        Um, no. "12,000 BTU/hour" isn't even a measure of heat; it's a measure of power. The amount of heat that needs to be removed from a ton of water to turn it into ice is closer to 300 kBTU than twelve. And it's BTU, not BTU per hour.

                        [/url]
                        </rant>
                        Yes, thanks for the good clarification - I should have been more specific - e.g makes 1 ton of ice per day. 144 BTU/pound *2000 = 288,000 BTU. Divide by 24 = 12,000 BTU/hr.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by drcampbell View Post


                          <rant>
                          One more example of a good reason to ditch the British system of weights & measures and use metric.

                          In the metric system, there are only seven base units to learn and just ONE unit of refrigeration capacity, the Watt, (or kilowatt, megawatt, et at.) No confusion and no need for unit conversion.
                          (there's also ONE unit of efficiency, the dimensionless ε -- no need to fart around with EER, SEER, COP or kW/ton)
                          Yes, it has it's merits and I've been advocating that on here for years!
                          Just one small correction. Although commonly, and incorrectly, called metric, it is SI. (Système Internationale d'Unités,)
                          You can't measure Joules by the metre.


                          Comment


                            #14
                            Nothing wrong with "metric system." Metrics are measurements of things, not necessarily lengths. You can use a formal foreign name if you wish, but it's not incorrect to use a name that more people actually understand.

                            Just one small correction: "its" has no apostrophe when used as a possessive pronoun.

                            Originally posted by Besoeker3
                            Yes, it has it's merits and I've been advocating that on here for years!
                            Just one small correction. Although commonly, and incorrectly, called metric, it is SI. (Système Internationale d'Unités,)
                            You can't measure Joules by the metre.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              This is a 3 ton condenser.
                              Microwave Poison will be seen to be a Trillion times worse than Asbestos.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X