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Relief Valve on EXP Enclosure

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    Relief Valve on EXP Enclosure

    I have an explosion proof enclosure with a relief valve located on top. Why would this enclosure have a relief valve?
    Time is of the essence, and I am low on essence. ~ Graham Hill

    #2
    are you sure it is a relief valve, and not just a vent?
    Bob

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      #3
      It looks like a valve, I believe it is called a "drain and breather", the one I am referring to is on top so it is a breather. These do not compromise the ability to contain an explosion?
      Time is of the essence, and I am low on essence. ~ Graham Hill

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        #4
        Originally posted by fifty60 View Post
        It looks like a valve, I believe it is called a "drain and breather", the one I am referring to is on top so it is a breather. These do not compromise the ability to contain an explosion?
        not if they are identified for such service.
        Bob

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          #5
          This is a typical manufacturer's application diagram.

          They do practically guarantee that flammable gases/vapors will enter an explosionproof enclosure. Then again, the flammable gases/vapors will enter through any threaded connection anyway, with or without a drain/breather, which is why I usually avoid them.

          That said, a drain/breather identified for Class I does not usually "compromise" the enclosure. The exception is salt-air applications where residue build up may (only may) defeat the spring. Personally, I've never had that happen.
          "Bob"
          Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
          Answers based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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