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Cable Capable of Transmitting Gases Example

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    Cable Capable of Transmitting Gases Example

    Can someone please direct me to an old thread or give me some examples of how a cable would be capable of transmitting gases?

    I have a C1 D1 area with a C1 D1 Rated 208 Breaker Panel that I need to run an S/O Cord into. The cable will originate from a C1 D2 area.

    Will the Cable Jacket need to be removed (center stripped) thru the seal-offs for this run of cable so each conductor can be packed and poured around? Or can the cable jacket be left intact since the cable will terminate inside the sealed C1 D1 Breaker Panel?

    The cable will pass thru a seal-off at the panel and another at a nearby wall that the cable passes thru into the D2 area.

    The cable is American Geoxal-125 Marine Shipboard Type Cable.

    Thanks.

    #2
    I've been referring to Section 501.15 FPN/IN No. 1 a lot lately; it and FPN/IN No. 2 offer a bit of insight about seals and how liquids, gases, and vapors can migrate through a cable.

    For all practical purposes, only Type MI construction actually prevents migration through the cable. UL will not certify any other Type construction as "gas blocking". UL will certify certain constructions, such as Type TC, as having, "...a gas/vaportight continuous sheath...", which is useful in several Division 2 applications.

    You may as well assume Type SO will permit migration and, unless it is being installed under Section 501.140, it isn't acceptable in Class I, Division 1 anyway.
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    Answers based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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      #3
      At first glance it sounds as if the install would be a violation of 400.8
      At my age, I'm accustomed to restaurants asking me to pay in advance, but now my bank has started sending me their calendar one month at a time.

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        #4
        Originally posted by augie47 View Post
        At first glance it sounds as if the install would be a violation of 400.8
        I think the OP should not have called it a SO cable early in the post. The product he referred to at the end of the post is not your general use type SO flexible cord.

        What little information I did look at on the cable type he mentioned - it probably is not a NEC recognized wiring method, but it also appears that it is not designed for applications where NEC typically applies from what I am seeing.
        I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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          #5
          If the product is listed as Type SO and is being installed per Sections 400.7(A)(10), 501.10(A)(2) and 501.140 it is acceptable.
          "Bob"
          Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
          Answers based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

          Comment

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