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LED retrofitting inside of c1d1 exp.proof globe lights

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    LED retrofitting inside of c1d1 exp.proof globe lights

    I an a o&m electrician in Alaska’s largest oil field and I have a few questions on upgrading existing light fixtures. Now after hours of research I understand why the LED mogul base HPS lamps need to be a c1d2 rated lamp in our c1d2 light fixtures, bec. of the driver inside of the LED lamp is being installed in the “jelly jar” of the fixture and now is no longer inside of the “sealed” ballast housing.
    The way I see things there shouldn’t be any reason why we wouldn’t be allowed to install a LED retrofit 150W HPS replacement lamp in our “globe” style c1d1 light fixtures as long as lamp is UL listed to be inside of enclosed fixtures and the T-code is the same or less then what is marked on the light fixture and it is encompassed by the 4.5 factory threads (6 on the HazLoc fixtures we have) and the lamp is protected by Tempered Exp. Proof glass. Now I have had to change plenty of 150W HPS Lamps and Ballasts inside of our fixtures so I know that they are basically little ovens so all I see is by installing a LED would only make them safer. Not to mention we would be installing high quality Finn cooled LED’s (not fan cooled ones) also I cannot find anything in the code that says we can’t put them in only info regarding c1d2 luminaries. Also I cannot find a LED rated for c1d1 hazardous locations only LED’s with a c1d2 rating witch also leaves me to be believe that the majority of people only see the safety benefit of the LED over the 400 deg. HPS lamp. I’m wanting to install these inside of our well houses witch are not pressurized or sealed air tight by any means so if there ever was a gas leak I don’t see any possible way that the fixture would ever even be able to fill with gas to ever allow them to explode but if they did they are explosion proof regardless if they were to have a HPS lamp or a LED. The LED also puts off a better light and would require less maintenance and don’t get nearly as hot, so to me it is a win win as far as safety is concerned. I had talked to this with our company Electrical Engineer and she wanted me to get an approval from the manufacturer before she would approve it but when I contacted them they only wanted to sell me new fixtures, also I have found our fixtures sold with a 50W LED (our retrofits are 24W T-5). Does anybody have any experience with this?

    #2
    I concur with your company's electrical engineer. The primary issue you need to overcome is in Section 501.130(A)(1) that requires the luminary to be identified as a complete assembly.
    "Bob"
    Robert B. Alexander, P.E.
    Answers based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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