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Direct line voltage lamp disconnects

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    Direct line voltage lamp disconnects

    With florescent lamps and ballast/driver fixtures, a "local disconnect" is required before the ballast/driver to isolate the lamps safely. With the introduction to direct line voltage LED lamps into standard troffers for retrofits and such, there is a mandate on placing a sticker to warn of the high voltage. My question is if there is a code requirement to install a disconnect as well in the fixture? In NEC 410, I saw that if the luminaire is powered from only one side, it did not. It would then be considered the same in effect as a single pin fluorescent tube.

    #2
    Originally posted by Rcuddy View Post
    With florescent lamps and ballast/driver fixtures, a "local disconnect" is required before the ballast/driver to isolate the lamps safely. With the introduction to direct line voltage LED lamps into standard troffers for retrofits and such, there is a mandate on placing a sticker to warn of the high voltage. My question is if there is a code requirement to install a disconnect as well in the fixture? In NEC 410, I saw that if the luminaire is powered from only one side, it did not. It would then be considered the same in effect as a single pin fluorescent tube.
    Welcome to the forum. 2017 NEC 410.130(G)(1) does not require it. There have been some threads on whether or not the tombstones are listed for the direct connection to line voltage but I think that is resolved now with the kits selling tombstones that are.
    Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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      #3
      Most ballasts put out way more than 120v, so it ought not be an issue. I have re-wired quite a few existing fluorescent fixtures for LED tubes. The important thing is to wire according to the pin feed of the given tube.
      Master Electrician
      Electrical Contractor
      Richmond, VA

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        #4
        Originally posted by LarryFine View Post
        Most ballasts put out way more than 120v, so it ought not be an issue. I have re-wired quite a few existing fluorescent fixtures for LED tubes. The important thing is to wire according to the pin feed of the given tube.
        Yeah agreed its done all the time now. It was 7 years ago now, I think the concern was something called Relative temperature index (RTI) and / or the available fault current was assumed to be mitigated by having a ballast and they were not tested for direct connections to 20A circuits, or something odd like that.
        I found the old letter here https://www.uslamp.com/Leviton_LED_R...ition_2012.pdf
        New letter here
        https://www.leviton.com/en/docs/Offi...UL_-_FINAL.pdf
        Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

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