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Proper color temperature for lighting in an art gallery?

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    #16
    Is there a "foot candles per" number that place like retail stores, etc. try to attain?

    Where would some sort of guide or standard be available?

    Thanks

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      #17
      Originally posted by GoldDigger View Post
      Just out of curiosity, in California is an art gallery subject to the same full energy efficiency and daylight harvesting rules as an office or retail space?
      yes, however.....

      display lighting is exempt from a lot of stuff.
      doesn't need dimming, doesn't count on daylight harvesting calcs,
      and can't be grouped into downlighting controls, or it becomes downlighting, obviously.
      needs a timeclock, or occ sensors.
      demand response only counts above 10K sq. ft. of permitted area. that is total lighting
      load.

      i've done a lot of retail stores that don't actually have any downlighting.
      some starbucks as well. they did some test stores that were lit about like
      a bar. those were the ones serving liquor. few and far between.

      does still require T24 third party certification, however.

      for example, monday i have a cert at Mariott LAX. 125,000 sq ft.
      all of it's done on occupancy sensors. demand response is across
      the entire connected load, all the lights in the area. 15% gross power reduction.
      i'll normally set it at 25%, so the lights that don't dim, the display lighing and
      such are compensated by the downlighting a bit more.

      lutron quantum system. whole bunch of controls and reports it's capable of.

      ~New signature under construction.~
      ~~~~Please excuse the mess.~~~~

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        #18
        Originally posted by brantmacga View Post
        Look into tunable white .... they can dial in exactly what they want.
        .
        The quality led's all have some sort of 3500-5000 switch on them now, i guess the manufacturers listened.....

        Aside from artists desires, maybe doc's wanting to assess skin color, the food inspectors (of all people) appear to be the only real authority that i've seen confronting meat counters wanting a redder spectrum

        ~RJ~

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          #19
          Originally posted by romex jockey View Post

          The quality led's all have some sort of 3500-5000 switch on them now, i guess the manufacturers listened.....
          Tunable allows you to access a broad spectrum of white lighting. Imagine a dimmer type control, but instead of adjusting the lighting level, it’s adjusting the color spectrum of the lamp.


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            #20
            Originally posted by brantmacga View Post

            Tunable allows you to access a broad spectrum of white lighting. Imagine a dimmer type control, but instead of adjusting the lighting level, it’s adjusting the color spectrum of the lamp.


            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
            is that what they call it?..... and is there such a 'dimmer widget' available ? I never get the memo out in the sticks Brant....~RJ~

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              #21
              Originally posted by romex jockey View Post

              is that what they call it?..... and is there such a 'dimmer widget' available ? I never get the memo out in the sticks Brant....~RJ~
              Manufacturers have various ways of accomplishing this .... some can be tunable with 0-10v wall dimmers. Aculux has a 0-10v fixture that’s field selectable between dimmable and tunable. Most use DALI or DMX type controls and are integrated into a building control system.


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                #22
                Color Temp isn't really what you are after, you should be Looking at CRI. The sun has a CRI of 100, meaning colors look 100% correct in the sun. Different light sources have a varying % or color correctness. For retail purposes, anything over 90 is awesom, anything over 80 is pretty darn good. When dealing with paintings, careful of UV damage.

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                  #23
                  Also, some manufactures make lighting sources that have variable Color Temp which can help you dial in the correct color team for each painting. Can save alot of call backs and lamp changes if you use variable sources.

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                    #24
                    Agree that color temperature is not that important, and may come down to the personal preference of the person in charge. Good color rendering is most important, at least 90 CRI.
                    Very low UV is important , but almost all LEDs are virtually Zero UV.
                    If the artworks are of significant value, then the lighting should be much reduced when visitors are not present to reduce ageing of the art and to save energy, but ensure that sufficient light remains for security cameras and for any security patrols.

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