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Armored Fiber Optic Cable Grounding

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    Armored Fiber Optic Cable Grounding

    I have some Corning armored direct bury fiber optic cable, its about 1/2" OD. This is my first application of armored FO cable...what kind of bonding clamp do I need for the cable sheath?
    I don't see anything in the Corning catalog
    Moderator-Washington State
    Ancora Imparo

    #2
    It’s fiber optic why does it need grounding?

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by mopowr steve View Post
      It’s fiber optic why does it need grounding?
      Armored Metal Clad....the sheathing.
      [COLOR="blue"]"Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


      Derek[/COLOR]

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        #4
        Best I could find out is that this clamp....maybe...is what is needed.


        https://www.discount-low-voltage.com...RoCKRcQAvD_BwE

        Or this kit which the above and more.

        https://www.discount-low-voltage.com...xoCNkAQAvD_BwE

        I did not go to the 3M website and verify. Some Corning person mentioned them in an article. Lost the link, sorry.
        [COLOR="blue"]"Electricity is really just organized lightning." George Carlin


        Derek[/COLOR]

        Comment


          #5
          Without seeing the cable I would say that the second of those shield bond clamps is what you need. I've used the first on copper cables many times which their video shows you how to do. I have never done fiber and there doesn't seem to be a video for it. I'm sure it's similar but the description talks about the strength members and there are extra parts.

          It just might be that you can use the first one depending on your installation.

          -Hal

          Comment


            #6
            What’s likely to energize it. And if something did there is no effect to the optic strand. Is it just for rigidity?

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by mopowr steve View Post
              What’s likely to energize it. And if something did there is no effect to the optic strand. Is it just for rigidity?
              Some of these are listed for indoor/outdoor, so you don't have a demarc box. You don't want something happening at building A to get to building B and vice versa.

              Comment


                #8
                I've never seen armored FO cable so I can only surmise that it's there for physical protection. I do suppose that there are applications that have electronics at one or both ends that could use the armor for a ground path or bond.

                -Hal

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by hbiss View Post
                  I've never seen armored FO cable so I can only surmise that it's there for physical protection. I do suppose that there are applications that have electronics at one or both ends that could use the armor for a ground path or bond.

                  -Hal
                  See [COLOR="#FF0000"]here[/COLOR] for an example. A similar product is being used on a current project of ours.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    See where it say’s “requires no grounding or bonding”

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by mopowr steve View Post
                      See where it say’s “requires no grounding or bonding”
                      I missed that but saw it does not want crushed or bent beyond certain radius in the assembly of whip instructions...
                      Student of electrical codes. Please Take others advice first.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by mopowr steve View Post
                        See where it say’s “requires no grounding or bonding”
                        The armor is not used for shielding so there is no need to ground for that aspect. If the cable is installed outdoors the NEC does not cover it. However, where it enters a building (or if it's run within a building) Article 770.93 applies which requires bonding of the metallic armor (or interruption of it) as close as possible to the point of entrance. So in that respect you kind of do have a "demarc" like copper or coax.

                        -Hal

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by mopowr steve View Post
                          What’s likely to energize it. And if something did there is no effect to the optic strand. Is it just for rigidity?
                          I would say gives it a little rigidity, possibly some rodent resistance for direct bury applications, also is a conductive path that works great for connecting a locator when needed down the road.

                          Originally posted by hbiss View Post
                          The armor is not used for shielding so there is no need to ground for that aspect. If the cable is installed outdoors the NEC does not cover it. However, where it enters a building (or if it's run within a building) Article 770.93 applies which requires bonding of the metallic armor (or interruption of it) as close as possible to the point of entrance. So in that respect you kind of do have a "demarc" like copper or coax.

                          -Hal
                          I can agree with that.
                          I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by mopowr steve View Post
                            What’s likely to energize it. And if something did there is no effect to the optic strand. Is it just for rigidity?
                            I am concerned about lightning, inducing a voltage which follows the armor to my equipment
                            Moderator-Washington State
                            Ancora Imparo

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