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GFCI Breaker for Pool Lights

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    GFCI Breaker for Pool Lights

    Does the NEC 2017 require a gfci circuit breaker to be used to feed pool lighting circuit if the lighting system in using a NSI Industries TPX300 pool light transformer?

    The TPX300 is a step down transformer 120 primary / 14 v secondary.

    680.23 (A) 3. Says GFCI breakers to be used branch circuits supplying luminaires operating at a voltage greater than the low-voltage contact limit.

    Looking at the situation from the primary side one would say YES to the GFCI
    Looking it from the secondary side one would say NO.

    Advise

    Thanks

    #2
    The primary side needs gfci protect however I have never seen gfci protection on the secondary side. We also gfci the line and that's all one can do.

    BTw, welcome to the forum
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky

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      #3
      I have never seen a GFCI made for LV. Further, because the LV secondary is prohibited from being grounded (IE it's floating), if it should fault to something there would be no risk.

      -Hal

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        #4
        Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
        The primary side needs gfci protect however I have never seen gfci protection on the secondary side. We also gfci the line and that's all one can do.

        BTw, welcome to the forum
        Does it ? The LV limit referred to in the article is 50v I believe; If you have less than that going to the shell of the pool I don’t believe a GFCI is required.


        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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          #5
          Originally posted by hbiss View Post
          I have never seen a GFCI made for LV. Further, because the LV secondary is prohibited from being grounded (IE it's floating), if it should fault to something there would be no risk.

          -Hal
          interesting, was the intent on purpose?....~RJ~

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            #6
            Good question because it doesn't only apply to pool LV wiring.

            -Hal

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              #7
              Originally posted by hbiss View Post
              Good question because it doesn't only apply to pool LV wiring.

              -Hal
              hmmmm. well i have some thoughts on that, but would like to ask what yours are first Hal

              ~RJ~

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                #8
                Only think I can think of is minimizing the shock hazard. 48V can give you a good tingle.

                -Hal

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                  #9
                  I'm imagining a step potential applies for water, along with those immersed in it

                  that said the older industrial ungrounded deltas w/impedance shunts (230.82-4) comes to mind

                  one leg to ground was no thing....

                  ~S~

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