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USA converting back to Direct Current

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    USA converting back to Direct Current

    I was wondering what everyone thought about this? With the renewable energy advancements in solar, wind and the latest in battery and capacitors (super capacitors) technology and the energy crunch, global warming, and oil prices. And the fact that the only reason that we began using Alternating Current to began with was for the distribution of electricity accross the US. Thomas Edison ran electricity to the first city using Direct Current, because that was all he new, and that was where he was passed up in technology by Tesla and alternating current. Most of our small electronic devices are DC, all are cars use DC, cordless drills, saws, cell phones and as far as lighting, LED is efficient and the lamps last for decades, they also can use battery's as backup. There are already alot of advantages to using DC. Soon we will all have our own renewable power plants on our roofs of our buildings and houses that produce DC and we will be driving electric cars that are DC, so why would we ever convert DC it into AC at all?

    #2
    This was covered in power systems EE301, distribution efficiency is everything.
    How would we replace the generation facilities, equipment, switchgear, etc?
    Sounds to me you want an intellectual discussion, not a practical one.
    You asked for thoughts and there is mine.
    Living in the sunshine, staying contented most of the time.

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      #3
      based on history, the interest in renewable energy will last until the current oil crunch is over, then they will forget about them/it again until the next energy crunch or global environmental disaster (which ever comes first)

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        #4
        Originally posted by nakulak
        based on history, the interest in renewable energy will last until the current oil crunch is over....
        My gut says this crunch is just getting started, and we are in for a very rude awakening.

        http://www.lifeaftertheoilcrash.net/

        While I don't think the "doom and gloom" will occur (not enough credit given to people), I do believe we are in for some difficult times down the road.
        Lou (wannabe economist)

        If you relentlessly pursue perfection, you will eventually catch excellence.

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          #5
          Originally posted by nakulak
          based on history, the interest in renewable energy will last until the current oil crunch is over, then they will forget about them/it again until the next energy crunch or global environmental disaster (which ever comes first)
          I hope you are right. But I don't expect the current oil crunch to ever be over...

          Back on topic: lots of nutters are putting DC distribution in their homes, as it saves on having dozens of wall warts about the place.

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            #6
            Originally posted by No Show
            I was wondering what everyone thought about this? ...?
            One advantage of DC is that because it does not incur capacitive losses in proximity of the earth, high voltage DC transmission is possible using towers that do not have to be so tall and massive. Solar and fuel cells too produce DC power. So DC might make a comback. Westinghouse and Edison were proponents of AC and DC respectively. Who knows it may be that we will be entering Edison's era again. e/m.
            A kwh saved is 2 kwhs earned

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              #7
              I don't see it changing at the end user anytime soon, but I think DC is already in use in some high voltage distribution systems.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Energy-Miser
                Who knows it may be that we will be entering Edison's era again. e/m.
                Or maybe an evolution of the best of both? We seem to be able to convert back and forth between AC and DC without difficulty.
                Lou (wannabe economist)

                If you relentlessly pursue perfection, you will eventually catch excellence.

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                  #9
                  Simple Dc cannot be distributed/transmitted with any efficiency known to man or physics.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by iwire
                    I don't see it changing at the end user anytime soon, but I think DC is already in use in some high voltage distribution systems.

                    Bob you are right, but only in the confines of a sub-station yard. Here in Texas, the state is not allowed to sync or connect to the national grid. So in interstae connections the outside source must convert to DC, pass to Tx, then immediately converted back to Ac for transmission and distribution. However this all takes place with the confines of a sub-station or a few feet of space.

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                      #11
                      DC can travel more miles then AC. AC is limit to about 150miles without a substation.
                      Got a Ph.D in DIY...

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                        #12
                        Check out this new artical (Ironic)

                        http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/20...-thomas-edison

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                          #13
                          Net Metering

                          Texas has now excepted net metering. Meaning that in the event a coustumers renewable energy system produced to much electricity (AC) it would let the meter spin backwards in to the utility co. grid act as the storage(instead of battery back up) untill the demand returns and they settle up at the end of the month.

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                            #14
                            Dereck,
                            Bob you are right, but only in the confines of a sub-station yard. Here in Texas, the state is not allowed to sync or connect to the national grid. So in interstae connections the outside source must convert to DC, pass to Tx, then immediately converted back to Ac for transmission and distribution. However this all takes place with the confines of a sub-station or a few feet of space.
                            Siemens and ABB both say they use high voltage DC for long distance energy transmission.
                            The High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) systems are used for energy transmission world-wide. They are a useful supplement or in some cases the only alternative for traditional High Voltage Alternating Current (HVAC) systems.
                            These HVDC Transmission systems are specifically used to:
                            economically transmit electrical energy long distances via overhead lines or cable,
                            connect asynchronous grids or grids with different frequencies.

                            Siemens has been one of the leading companies in the HVDC business for more than 25 years.
                            The use of HVDC at 800 kV, has been found efficient, environmentally friendly and economically attractive for large point-to-point power transmissions of the order of 6,400 MW and more, with distances of more than 1,000 km. Worldwide there is an increasing interest in the application of HVDC at 800 kV.
                            Don
                            Don, Illinois
                            (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Just think about all of the new polarity debates we'll be able to have! :rolleyes: :grin:
                              Master Electrician
                              Electrical Contractor
                              Richmond, VA

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