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    #76
    The only thing thay anyone ever cared about was the UL stamp/mark

    As long as the Interlock has a UL mark/stamp, which ALL of the ones made by the manufacturers SQ D, ITE or GE or Interlockkit.com have then my inspector said he would pass the install. And since that conversation I have installed over 30 of them!! The one interlock I won't use is the ones made by Natramelec.com and it is because he does not have the UL listing.
    Can't tell you about Jersey, don't care!

    Don

    Interlock kits

    UL listed interlock kits are accepted by licensed electrical inspectors as code compliant on installations that have been issued a permit by a municipality. (I think that covers it)

    If they are not accepted in your area I would ask the inspector for a code section prohibiting them.[/QUOTE]

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      #77
      Who gets thrown under the bus?

      Originally posted by iwire View Post
      Doing illegal un-permitted work so you can use equipment you seem to know they would turn down.

      I fail to see the license making a difference.
      Licensing may make a difference in the long run. As an elelectrial engineer (prone to relocation), but not a licensed electrician, I hire my contractor to do my electrical work, even though he and his subs may not pull a permit. If any of his work shows up as not meeting code during a home inspection, it will be him that gets thrown under the bus for any rework necessary.

      Yes, all of his contracts say "includes all necessary permits and inspections" and "all work performed in accordance with current codes and standards."

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        #78
        NEC 702.4 (B) System Capacity

        From my observation, may of the portable generators used by home owners are undersized for their full home loads. How do these accessories that effectively make the service pannel into a piece of manual transfer equipment, ensure compliance with 704.2(B)(1)?

        [COLOR=#880000][COLOR=#880000][COLOR=#880000]702.4 Capacity and Rating
        [/COLOR][/COLOR][/COLOR]
        (1) Manual Transfer Equipment.
        Where manual transferequipment is used, an optional standby system shall haveadequate capacity and rating for the supply of all equipmentintended to be operated at one time. The user of the optionalstandby system shall be permitted to select the load connected
        to the system.

        Are we to assume the installers will provide adiquate instructions to the homeowners regarding the turning off of certian breakers to bring their load down to a level that their generator can serve? ... i.e., turn off the pool pump, sauna, AC, ... .

        Comment


          #79
          Originally posted by Terrier View Post
          From my observation, may of the portable generators used by home owners are undersized for their full home loads. How do these accessories that effectively make the service pannel into a piece of manual transfer equipment, ensure compliance with 704.2(B)(1)?

          [COLOR=#880000][COLOR=#880000][COLOR=#880000]702.4 Capacity and Rating
          [/COLOR]
          [/COLOR]
          [/COLOR]

          (1) Manual Transfer Equipment.
          Where manual transferequipment is used, an optional standby system shall haveadequate capacity and rating for the supply of all equipmentintended to be operated at one time. The user of the optionalstandby system shall be permitted to select the load connected
          to the system.

          Are we to assume the installers will provide adiquate instructions to the homeowners regarding the turning off of certian breakers to bring their load down to a level that their generator can serve? ... i.e., turn off the pool pump, sauna, AC, ... .

          If they are not informed, it doesn't take too long to figure it out, or worst case they end up paying for a service call to get educated on the matter.
          I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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            #80
            Last one I installed came with red critical load stickers. I labelled the heat, fridge, sump pump, freezer, etc.

            The rest of the panel is properly labelled (as per code) and I spent a few minutes explaining to them that they just spent roughly $1000 on a generator and if they don't want to kill it they can't act like they're running on utility power.

            Maybe we should be required to give a comprehension test prior to pulling permits for interlock kits!
            Mike, Dutchess County, NY

            Comment


              #81
              Don't these portable generators have main breakers? Isn't overloading them more of a nuisance than anything else?
              Rob

              Moderator

              All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

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