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Would you (an inspector) call this subject to abuse? GEC

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    #16
    Originally posted by kwired View Post
    Then there are those of us who think they put to much emphasis on the importance of grounding electrode systems, especially when connected to utility power where there is already a huge electrode system.
    I would think it would have a lot to do with where the Lightning decides to hit.

    JAP>

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      #17
      Originally posted by jap View Post
      I would think unstable voltages to the whole system would be much more noticeable than a single branch circuit that may not be working.
      Generally the bonding done where a #6 is used across floorjoist to get somewhere is just that, not so much to stabilize the voltage like at the service Transfomer.
      If a #6 bonding jumper was to come loose from a water pipe I doubt you'd ever see a fluctuation of system voltage.


      JAP>
      Originally posted by kwired View Post
      Then there are those of us who think they put to much emphasis on the importance of grounding electrode systems, especially when connected to utility power where there is already a huge electrode system.
      Yes, well, no real arguments there. See my last parenthetical sentence. I was just trying to explain that historically the code makers have had a strong bias towards keeping grounded systems grounded, and thus provided extra rules for the GEC.

      I agree that unstable voltages are more likely to be noticed across the system l, but what I said was that something or someone is more likely to get damaged. As in, shocked by parts that should be grounded but aren't, or fried by inappropriate voltage. I stand by that, actually.

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        #18
        Originally posted by richwaskowitz View Post
        I guess I jut don't see how a #2 aluminum single conductor is more at risk than an 8-3 Romex.
        If the inspector decides the 8-3 is subject to damage you can't run that under the joists either.

        Again it's an inspector call.

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          #19
          Originally posted by jap View Post
          I would think it would have a lot to do with where the Lightning decides to hit.

          JAP>
          And if it even makes it's way to the electrical system.

          Direct hit to a structure, a grounding electrode may change how current flows in the event, you still will have some likely significant damage.

          Surge coming in on the supply line because of a nearby strike, it may actually help you out some. IMO that is about all a GES is useful for on a utility supplied system, or similar event involving higher voltage line contacting a lower voltage line. There may still be some damages but it may help minimize it.
          I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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            #20
            Originally posted by kwired View Post
            And if it even makes it's way to the electrical system.

            Direct hit to a structure, a grounding electrode may change how current flows in the event, you still will have some likely significant damage.

            Surge coming in on the supply line because of a nearby strike, it may actually help you out some. IMO that is about all a GES is useful for on a utility supplied system, or similar event involving higher voltage line contacting a lower voltage line. There may still be some damages but it may help minimize it.
            Surges from nearby lightning strikes do actually help out.
            That's why I never get on the Treadmill during a storm.
            Not that its dangerous, it's just that every time lightning hits close, the surge speeds up the motor and makes me have to walk faster.
            I like to get on it when the AC is on, my wife is cooking something in the oven and my kid is drying his hair in the bathroom with the Heat/fan/light on.
            It's much easier to keep the pace that way.

            JAP>

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              #21
              Originally posted by jap View Post
              Surges from nearby lightning strikes do actually help out.
              That's why I never get on the Treadmill during a storm.
              Not that its dangerous, it's just that every time lightning hits close, the surge speeds up the motor and makes me have to walk faster.
              I like to get on it when the AC is on, my wife is cooking something in the oven and my kid is drying his hair in the bathroom with the Heat/fan/light on.
              It's much easier to keep the pace that way.

              JAP>
              You have to hope it hits on the load side of the meter - otherwise you pay the POCO for that surge of energy.
              I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by kwired View Post
                You have to hope it hits on the load side of the meter - otherwise you pay the POCO for that surge of energy.
                As long as I get what I'm paying for without burning anything up I'm good with it.
                The higher voltage does increase efficiency for a short amount of time.

                JAP>

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