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AFCI/GFCI for dust collector in basement work shop area?

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    AFCI/GFCI for dust collector in basement work shop area?

    Hello,. I want to run a dedicated 20 amp circuit from the breaker panel about 25feet to provide power for a 2HP 120 V motor for a Harbor Freight dust collector. The work area is in the basement on the same side of the basement as the laundry area but about 15 away from the washing machine. Do I need that circuit to be protected by AFCI? What about GFCI? Or do I need a combo? Running #12-2 with Ground. Combo breakers are nearly $50.00. What are my options based on the latest NEC?

    #2
    Originally posted by RichardinVA View Post
    Hello,. I want to run a dedicated 20 amp circuit from the breaker panel about 25feet to provide power for a 2HP 120 V motor for a Harbor Freight dust collector. The work area is in the basement on the same side of the basement as the laundry area but about 15 away from the washing machine. Do I need that circuit to be protected by AFCI? What about GFCI? Or do I need a combo? Running #12-2 with Ground. Combo breakers are nearly $50.00. What are my options based on the latest NEC?

    If by your user name you are in VA you do not need AFCI breakers there; we're still under the 2012 IRC (for residential; 2011 NEC for everything else) which only mandates them for bedroom outlets. I thought all basements needed GFCI tho I havent done a basement in so long I'd have to check. I dont have a 2017 NEC to know what it says.

    http://www.dhcd.virginia.gov/index.p...code-usbc.html

    New codes will likely be in effect in July of this year.
    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

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      #3
      Originally posted by JFletcher View Post
      I thought all basements needed GFCI tho I havent done a basement in so long I'd have to check.
      New codes will likely be in effect in July of this year.
      GFI's in unfinished basements are required.
      Haven't seen when we go to 2014 but I do agree it's probably July 1.
      Sometimes I don't know whether I'm the boxer or the bag.

      Comment


        #4
        Moved-- not in VA in Minneapolis MN now

        Originally posted by RichardinVA View Post
        Hello,. I want to run a dedicated 20 amp circuit from the breaker panel about 25feet to provide power for a 2HP 120 V motor for a Harbor Freight dust collector. The work area is in the basement on the same side of the basement as the laundry area but about 15 away from the washing machine. Do I need that circuit to be protected by AFCI? What about GFCI? Or do I need a combo? Running #12-2 with Ground. Combo breakers are nearly $50.00. What are my options based on the latest NEC?
        Sorry but I am now in Minneapolis MN.
        But thanks for the rules of VA. If someone knows about MN code adoption rules and answers my questions this will be great?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by RichardinVA View Post
          Sorry but I am now in Minneapolis MN.
          But thanks for the rules of VA. If someone knows about MN code adoption rules and answers my questions this will be great?
          Minnesota, Va. either one NEC is still the same Gfi protection required in unfinished basements.
          Sometimes I don't know whether I'm the boxer or the bag.

          Comment


            #6
            AFCI not required in 2011 or 2014 NEC - assuming this is in "unfinished basement" area.

            GFCI protection is required at least since 2005 or 2008 NEC IF you are supplying a 15 or 20 amp 120 volt receptacle, regardless of what gets plugged into it. A direct wired machine wouldn't require GFCI, but chances are your machine wasn't intended to be direct wired.
            I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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              #7
              Originally posted by kwired View Post
              AFCI not required in 2011 or 2014 NEC - assuming this is in "unfinished basement" area.

              GFCI protection is required at least since 2005 or 2008 NEC IF you are supplying a 15 or 20 amp 120 volt receptacle, regardless of what gets plugged into it. A direct wired machine wouldn't require GFCI, but chances are your machine wasn't intended to be direct wired.
              Thanks for the help. I will use a GFCI receptical for the dust collector. I was trying to find out what would be the required protection for it based on its location and find out what if anything a AFCI would trip under load of the 2 HP 120v blower motor. Thanks again.

              Comment


                #8
                A combination AFCI was required Jan 1, 2008. By Combo, do you mean dual function? A dual function afci will be a combo type, but not the other way around.
                Moderator-Washington State
                Ancora Imparo

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by RichardinVA View Post
                  Thanks for the help. I will use a GFCI receptical for the dust collector. I was trying to find out what would be the required protection for it based on its location and find out what if anything a AFCI would trip under load of the 2 HP 120v blower motor. Thanks again.
                  assuming the dust collector is for sawdust, make sure all the ductwork
                  and fittings are grounded. static build up in a dust laden atmosphere
                  can turn out sub optimally.
                  ~New signature under construction.~
                  ~~~~Please excuse the mess.~~~~

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Fulthrotl View Post
                    assuming the dust collector is for sawdust, make sure all the ductwork
                    and fittings are grounded. static build up in a dust laden atmosphere
                    can turn out sub optimally.
                    It's a small dust collector not a grain silo. Besides something like this would be grounded. Doubt it has an explosion proof motor, nor needs one. Bonding any ductwork wouldnt hurt but isnt required.
                    Electricians do it until it Hertz!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by RichardinVA View Post
                      Sorry but I am now in Minneapolis MN.
                      But thanks for the rules of VA. If someone knows about MN code adoption rules and answers my questions this will be great?
                      The way the laundry area in an unfinished basement is viewed in MN is a bit of a grey area. It's hard to define the boundaries when the laundry machines are sitting in an open, unfinished basement with no dividing walls. The Dept of Labor and Industry kind of addressed it here, in question 3:

                      http://www.dli.mn.gov/ccld/PDF/NECFAQ14.pdf

                      Most AHJ's I have talked to go by a 10' or 12' rule of thumb to define the laundry. Basically, the laundry area is a 10'x10' or 12'x12' area around the laundry machines, with the machines being centered on one side of the square. Everything in that square goes by laundry rules, meaning all outlets need to be on the laundry circuit and AFCI and GFCI protected. All lighting serving that area needs to be AFCI protected.

                      So, if your dust collector is 15' from the washing machine, you are only required to GFCI protect, not AFCI protect. Hope this helps.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by MNSparky View Post
                        The way the laundry area in an unfinished basement is viewed in MN is a bit of a grey area. It's hard to define the boundaries when the laundry machines are sitting in an open, unfinished basement with no dividing walls. The Dept of Labor and Industry kind of addressed it here, in question 3:

                        http://www.dli.mn.gov/ccld/PDF/NECFAQ14.pdf

                        Most AHJ's I have talked to go by a 10' or 12' rule of thumb to define the laundry. Basically, the laundry area is a 10'x10' or 12'x12' area around the laundry machines, with the machines being centered on one side of the square. Everything in that square goes by laundry rules, meaning all outlets need to be on the laundry circuit and AFCI and GFCI protected. All lighting serving that area needs to be AFCI protected.

                        So, if your dust collector is 15' from the washing machine, you are only required to GFCI protect, not AFCI protect. Hope this helps.
                        Sounds like too large of an area to assume to be for the laundry to me. Laundry in my house isn't in the basement but is in space not much larger then what the washer and dryer take up. Get a stack unit and it could be even smaller yet.

                        Any other outlet on same circuit would have to be considered laundry outlets as well. I could see localities making a rule that at least one lighting outlet near the laundry be on the laundry circuit or at least be AFCI protected, but don't see that as a requirement by NEC alone.
                        I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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