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    "do not connect to AFCI protected circuit"

    I was reading the supplied "installation manual" with a 120v Chandelier lift. It states: "do not connect motor to AFCI protected circuit".
    It is to be installed in a "residential dwelling".
    The code's position:
    "210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection. Arcfault
    circuit-interrupter protection shall be provided as required
    in 210.12(A) (B), and (C). The arc-fault circuit interrupter
    shall be installed in a readily accessible location.
    (A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and
    20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets or devices installed
    in dwelling unit kitchens, family rooms, dining
    rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms,
    sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, laundry areas,
    or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by any of
    the means described in 210.12(A)(1) through (6): "

    What a poor boy like me to do?
    My sarcasm is of a level that many of lower intelligence think I am.

    #2
    Originally posted by tadavidson View Post
    I was reading the supplied "installation manual" with a 120v Chandelier lift. It states: "do not connect motor to AFCI protected circuit".
    It is to be installed in a "residential dwelling".
    The code's position:
    "210.12 Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection. Arcfault
    circuit-interrupter protection shall be provided as required
    in 210.12(A) (B), and (C). The arc-fault circuit interrupter
    shall be installed in a readily accessible location.
    (A) Dwelling Units. All 120-volt, single-phase, 15- and
    20-ampere branch circuits supplying outlets or devices installed
    in dwelling unit kitchens, family rooms, dining
    rooms, living rooms, parlors, libraries, dens, bedrooms,
    sunrooms, recreation rooms, closets, hallways, laundry areas,
    or similar rooms or areas shall be protected by any of
    the means described in 210.12(A)(1) through (6): "

    What a poor boy like me to do?
    Tell who ever is purchasing the unit that they need to return it and get their money back. I have run into this type of situation with commercial kitchen equipment that included the "do not connect to a GFCI protected circuit" disclaimer, whenever they are told they will not get the sale they usually cave. The problem is the manufacturers to fix, not the code(s).

    Roger
    Moderator

    Comment


      #3
      What if I set a 10 amp fused disconnect at the load center and fed this motor's circuit?
      My sarcasm is of a level that many of lower intelligence think I am.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by tadavidson View Post
        What if I set a 10 amp fused disconnect at the load center and fed this motor's circuit?
        I doubt the instructions to the unit allow that either.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by roger View Post
          Tell who ever is purchasing the unit that they need to return it and get their money back. The problem is the manufacturers to fix, not the code(s).

          Roger
          ^^^^^^^
          Seriously this

          To the OP: It's not your responsibility to accommodate equipment that requires code to be violated in order to be installed.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by tadavidson View Post
            What if I set a 10 amp fused disconnect at the load center and fed this motor's circuit?
            NEC still requires AFCI protection.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by iwire View Post
              I doubt the instructions to the unit allow that either.
              I know, I know just looking for loop holes.
              My sarcasm is of a level that many of lower intelligence think I am.

              Comment


                #8
                If the whole unit is in the attic, I don't see how it needs AFCI protection.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by peter d View Post
                  If the whole unit is in the attic, I don't see how it needs AFCI protection.
                  my thoughts also

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I'm assuming you can connect the chandelier to a separate power source?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by 480sparky View Post
                      NEC still requires AFCI protection.
                      It is not a 15 or 20 amp circuit, so why is it covered?
                      The idea is not to tap it off a breaker at all. Or run the fused disconnect from a 25 or 30 circuit.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by peter d View Post
                        If the whole unit is in the attic, I don't see how it needs AFCI protection.
                        Is the key switch in the living space?
                        Rob

                        Moderator

                        All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by 480sparky View Post
                          NEC still requires AFCI protection.
                          How so? Disconnect fed from 220 volt DP 20. Fused down to 10 amp for branch circuit. 10 amp "outlets" not mentioned in AFCI law.
                          My sarcasm is of a level that many of lower intelligence think I am.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by GoldDigger View Post
                            It is not a 15 or 20 amp circuit, so why is it covered?
                            The idea is not to tap it off a breaker at all. Or run the fused disconnect from a 25 or 30 circuit.
                            Use of fuse or breaker is not relevant.

                            Do the instruction require a 15 or 20 amp circuit? Would using a 10a circuit (yea, you can get 10a breakers) violate 210.23(B)(2)?
                            Last edited by 480sparky; 03-13-17, 08:43 PM.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by infinity View Post
                              Is the key switch in the living space?
                              Yes, it is (was) to be.
                              My sarcasm is of a level that many of lower intelligence think I am.

                              Comment

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