Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Service neutral bonding location

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #31
    Originally posted by kmh View Post
    Lightning is a whole different story than ground fault current. Charge a capacitor with DC voltage, then take the voltage connection away. Now jumper one side of the capacitor to the other. You'll get momentary current flow as the charges equalize. That's lightning. It's two opposite charges equalizing.

    True, but has nothing to do with this conversation -

    Comment


      #32
      Originally posted by Dale001289 View Post
      True, but has nothing to do with this conversation -
      This is a conversation that "evolved." :-)

      Comment


        #33
        Originally posted by kmh View Post
        This is a conversation that "evolved." :-)

        Comment


          #34
          Originally posted by kmh View Post
          Lightning is a whole different story than ground fault current. Charge a capacitor with DC voltage, then take the voltage connection away. Now jumper one side of the capacitor to the other. You'll get momentary current flow as the charges equalize. That's lightning. It's two opposite charges equalizing.
          And that momentary current flow is just that.
          A current flow.

          Not a ground fault.


          JAP>

          Comment


            #35
            Originally posted by jap View Post
            And that momentary current flow is just that.
            A current flow.

            Not a ground fault.


            JAP>
            Call it what you want.... but in a major lightning strike you could have hundreds of thousands of Amps/Volts hitting the earth — where does it go after it hits the earth?
            Answer: it travels horizontally thru the earth seeking a path to come out - and where is the least resistance? Is it a tree? A fence?
            Remember the transformer XO is at very low resistance



            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

            Comment


              #36
              Originally posted by Dale001289 View Post
              Call it what you want.... but in a major lightning strike you could have hundreds of thousands of Amps/Volts hitting the earth — where does it go after it hits the earth?
              Answer: it travels horizontally thru the earth seeking a path to come out - and where is the least resistance? Is it a tree? A fence?
              Remember the transformer XO is at very low resistance



              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

              For the Lightning strike to hit the earth, or a strike from the earth to the clouds, that portion of the cloud to earth or earth to cloud path had to be the path of least resistance to begin with.

              Otherwise, the lightning strike would have never happened in the first place.

              JAP>

              Comment


                #37
                [QUOTE=jap;1919495]For the Lightning strike to hit the earth, or a strike from the earth to the clouds, that portion of the cloud to earth or earth to cloud path had to be the path of least resistance to begin with.

                Otherwise, the lightning strike would have never happened in the first place.

                JAP>[/QUOTE

                Comment


                  #38
                  If a lightning strike hit out in the middle of a field with nothing electrical near the strike location, I find it hard to believe that it would travel through the earth until it found the XO terminal of a transformer for it to come back out of the ground.

                  Why would it search for that point?

                  JAP>

                  Comment


                    #39
                    [QUOTE=Dale001289;1919496]
                    Originally posted by jap View Post
                    For the Lightning strike to hit the earth, or a strike from the earth to the clouds, that portion of the cloud to earth or earth to cloud path had to be the path of least resistance to begin with.

                    Otherwise, the lightning strike would have never happened in the first place.

                    JAP>[/QUOTE

                    Why the head shake ?

                    JAP>

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by Dale001289 View Post
                      Call it what you want.... but in a major lightning strike you could have hundreds of thousands of Amps/Volts hitting the earth — where does it go after it hits the earth?
                      Answer: it travels horizontally thru the earth seeking a path to come out - and where is the least resistance? Is it a tree? A fence?
                      Remember the transformer XO is at very low resistance
                      Oooh, gotta disagree with that! A charge of one polarity accumulates in the clouds ( I think it's positive, but Google it yourself.) A charge of the opposite polarity accumulates in the ground. Eventually the potential difference is so high that the atmosphere ionizes creating a conductive path between the two opposite charges, thereby equalizing the potential difference. Current does not need to flow any farther than that. It's merely a matter of positive charges meeting negative charges to reach equilibrium. And this has nothing to do with returning ground fault current to a transformer XO.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Originally posted by kmh View Post
                        Oooh, gotta disagree with that! A charge of one polarity accumulates in the clouds ( I think it's positive, but Google it yourself.) A charge of the opposite polarity accumulates in the ground. Eventually the potential difference is so high that the atmosphere ionizes creating a conductive path between the two opposite charges, thereby equalizing the potential difference. Current does not need to flow any farther than that. It's merely a matter of positive charges meeting negative charges to reach equilibrium. And this has nothing to do with returning ground fault current to a transformer XO.
                        Oh man oh man,,,,,,,, we're getting somewhere now.

                        JAP>

                        Comment


                          #42
                          Although I would think the difference of potential would need to decrease between the 2 for the strike to happen.

                          JAP>

                          Comment


                            #43
                            Originally posted by kmh View Post
                            Oooh, gotta disagree with that! A charge of one polarity accumulates in the clouds ( I think it's positive, but Google it yourself.) A charge of the opposite polarity accumulates in the ground. Eventually the potential difference is so high that the atmosphere ionizes creating a conductive path between the two opposite charges, thereby equalizing the potential difference. Current does not need to flow any farther than that. It's merely a matter of positive charges meeting negative charges to reach equilibrium. And this has nothing to do with returning ground fault current to a transformer XO.
                            [emoji15]


                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                            Comment


                              #44
                              Originally posted by jap View Post
                              If a lightning strike hit out in the middle of a field with nothing electrical near the strike location, I find it hard to believe that it would travel through the earth until it found the XO terminal of a transformer for it to come back out of the ground.

                              Why would it search for that point?

                              JAP>
                              A strike in an open field would still result in the voltage/current traveling in the least resistive path - if NO transformer existed it would seek other sources such as a tree, a fence post or even a human being. Remember the earth itself is a relatively high resistance. That’s why it won’t travel to China


                              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Originally posted by Dale001289 View Post
                                A strike in an open field would still result in the voltage/current traveling in the least resistive path - if NO transformer existed it would seek other sources such as a tree, a fence post or even a human being. Remember the earth itself is a relatively high resistance. That’s why it won’t travel to China


                                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                                What does a transformer have that would make a lightning strike that hit the ground make it want to head that way ?

                                Wouldn't it make more sense to say that if a lightning strike hit the transformer, the GEC, would give that current a path to the earth?


                                JAP>

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X