Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PROTECTIVE TERMINAL LUG COVERS PER 110.27

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    PROTECTIVE TERMINAL LUG COVERS PER 110.27

    Are lug covers (in panels) required per 110.27

    #2
    Originally posted by Joseph Alexander View Post
    Are lug covers (in panels) required per 110.27
    Installing the panel cover resolves issues covered in 110.27.

    There is a service entrance barrier requirement in 408.3, it is there because you normally can't easily de-energize the service conductors when working inside the service entrance enclosure.
    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by kwired View Post
      Installing the panel cover resolves issues covered in 110.27.

      There is a service entrance barrier requirement in 408.3, it is there because you normally can't easily de-energize the service conductors when working inside the service entrance enclosure.
      is there some sort of universal barrier fr the lugs? I mean, here in Jamaica they do not have covers yet on the boxes for the entry lugs, and boxes sold here are not always names I recognise from USA...Much Mexican and Brazilian things sold here..lol...
      Student of electrical codes. Please Take others advice first.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Adamjamma View Post
        is there some sort of universal barrier fr the lugs? I mean, here in Jamaica they do not have covers yet on the boxes for the entry lugs, and boxes sold here are not always names I recognise from USA...Much Mexican and Brazilian things sold here..lol...
        Not exactly the same but linemen use rubber blankets, line hose, plastic "clothes pins" (clamps), and similar materials to do temporary insulation all the time. It's called cover up. It is especially important if there is a risk of brushing up against an exposed nearby conductor when your attention is somewhere else like what you are working on.

        Https://www.neca-neis.org/docs/defau...nd-isolate.pdf

        Just take a piece of plexiglass that is wider than the distribution panel and say 6" high by 1/8-1/4" thick. Drill holes in it along the top and bottom edges. Use cord or bungee or tie wraps looped through the holes and tied around fittings, nearby conduits, or otherwise wrapped around something to hold it in place so it won't get loose.

        In a plant I used to work at had a lot of old equipment where the original electrical work left way too much wire exposed when they stripped the ends. The plant safety people made it hard on electdicians by requiring rubber gloves for all work where there were any exposed conductors in the panel. Plant safety culture was all about back stabbjng each other. They would use a sheet of plexiglass and a couple tie wraps to hold it in place exactly as I've described. They left them in place permanently. Simple, cheap time saver that fixed the potential safety issue.

        In factory built panels I've also seen it heated and bent into a C shape so that the ears stuck into a pocket somewhere and held it in place with or without screws.

        Sent from my SM-T350 using Tapatalk

        Comment

        Working...
        X