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    Kitchen counter pop-up receptacles

    A colleague asked me if it was Code compliant to install pop-up receptacles on a kitchen counter surface. My first response was that it was not. But, then I found these on the Internet :

    https://www.kitchenpowerpopups.com/p...caAjUKEALw_wcB

    Any thoughts on doing this and getting past an inspection. Obviously they will have to be GFCI protected.

    #2
    You might run afoul of getting it accepted due to it being plug-n-cord connected. 400.12.

    T&B used to make one that looks identical but was hard-wired. They discontinued them a few years back and it took me a lot of work to locate one for a hole in a c'top I had cut in.

    Comment


      #3
      Mockett makes several versions that are hardwired.
      https://www.mockett.com

      We just used this model for a project.
      https://www.mockett.com/power-commun...cs103a-ee.html
      Curt Swartz
      Electrical Contractor

      Comment


        #4
        Article 400 only applies to cords that are listed under UL 62, refer to 400.1 and Informative Annex A. The cord that comes with the pop-up receptacle is most likely listed under UL 817 and is not a flexible cord or cable. This means that you are allowed to conceal the power cord, run through members, etc.

        Keep in mind what code cycle your municipality is under. The 2017 NEC corrected this discrepancy and placed cord sets and cord adapters under the scope of Article 400.

        Comment


          #5
          The hangup can be is that the unit has to be UL listed as an assembly. Around St Louis this was debated very heavily by the AHJ and I think only the Hubbel unit was approved.

          http://ecatalog.hubbell-wiring.com/p...l_WLFTS004.pdf

          Check with you local AHJ before getting too far along

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by jimmyglen View Post
            The hangup can be is that the unit has to be UL listed as an assembly. Around St Louis this was debated very heavily by the AHJ and I think only the Hubbel unit was approved.

            http://ecatalog.hubbell-wiring.com/p...l_WLFTS004.pdf

            Check with you local AHJ before getting too far along
            Same can be said about any product in that it needs to be listed for its use. I was merely trying to point out that NEC 400 shouldn't be applied to this product.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by goldstar View Post
              A colleague asked me if it was Code compliant to install pop-up receptacles on a kitchen counter surface. My first response was that it was not. But, then I found these on the Internet :

              https://www.kitchenpowerpopups.com/p...caAjUKEALw_wcB

              Any thoughts on doing this and getting past an inspection. Obviously they will have to be GFCI protected.

              Yes it is compliant to have a pop up receptacle installed in the counter. However, if it is not direct wired someone could argue that the required outlet is under the counter and thus does not qualify as the compliant receptacle. The plug in version is really not much different than a plug strip.
              They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
              She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
              I can't help it if I'm lucky

              Comment


                #8
                I've used these. I see there is a direct wire and a cord connected.

                http://www.lewelectric.com/kitchen-c...ntertop-boxes/

                Comment


                  #9
                  Anything popping out of a kitchen countertop is going to be filled with grunge in a matter of months, if not days! One good spill of pancake batter...

                  How long will the 'pop-up' function continue to function without the spring breaking or rusting away? Then the only way to pop it up will be by sticking a knife in the gap around the fixture and prying it up.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by jeremy.zinkofsky View Post
                    Article 400 only applies to cords that are listed under UL 62, refer to 400.1 and Informative Annex A. The cord that comes with the pop-up receptacle is most likely listed under UL 817 and is not a flexible cord or cable. This means that you are allowed to conceal the power cord, run through members, etc.

                    Keep in mind what code cycle your municipality is under. The 2017 NEC corrected this discrepancy and placed cord sets and cord adapters under the scope of Article 400.
                    400.12 does seem to apply to flexible cord sets and power supply cords.


                    Informational Note: UL 817, Cord Sets and Power-Supply Cords,
                    allows the use of flexible cords manufactured in accordance
                    with UL 62, Flexible Cords and Cables. See 400.10 and 400.12 for
                    flexible cords that are part of a listed cord set or power-supply
                    cord.

                    400.12 Uses Not Permitted. Unless specifically permitted in
                    400.10, flexible cables, flexible cord sets, and power supply
                    cords shall not be used for the following:
                    (1) As a substitute for the fixed wiring of

                    Comment


                      #11
                      [COLOR=#333333]400.12 does seem to apply to flexible cord sets and power supply cords.[/COLOR]


                      [COLOR=#333333]Informational Note: UL 817, Cord Sets and Power-Supply Cords,[/COLOR]
                      [COLOR=#333333]allows the use of flexible cords manufactured in accordance[/COLOR]
                      [COLOR=#333333]with UL 62, Flexible Cords and Cables. See 400.10 and 400.12 for[/COLOR]
                      [COLOR=#333333]flexible cords that are part of a listed cord set or power-supply[/COLOR]
                      [COLOR=#333333]cord.[/COLOR]

                      [COLOR=#333333]400.12 Uses Not Permitted. Unless specifically permitted in[/COLOR]
                      [COLOR=#333333]400.10, flexible cables, flexible cord sets, and power supply[/COLOR]
                      [COLOR=#333333]cords shall not be used for the following:[/COLOR]
                      [COLOR=#333333]

                      [/COLOR]What code year are you referring to?

                      400.12 does not exist in the 2014 NEC.

                      Either way, UL 817 products are not within the scope of 400.1 as they are not listed as flexible cords. So the entirety of article 400 can be ignored.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by jeremy.zinkofsky View Post
                        400.12 does not exist in the 2014 NEC..
                        It's 400.8 there.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by 480sparky View Post
                          It's 400.8 there.
                          That only applies to flexible cords. Power cords and adapters listed under UL 817 are not flexible cords and are not restricted by 400.8.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by jeremy.zinkofsky View Post
                            That only applies to flexible cords. Power cords and adapters listed under UL 817 are not flexible cords and are not restricted by 400.8.

                            I don't get this. A flexible cord can be a power cord...NO?
                            They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
                            She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
                            I can't help it if I'm lucky

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
                              I don't get this. A flexible cord can be a power cord...NO?
                              It's all about the UL listing. All products, means and methods, etc. have to be listed for their use. This effectively categorizes or defines the difference between products. For example, the NEC doesn't combine the uses permitted for EMT and Rigid even though they are both conduit. They have different UL listings.

                              The listing classifies the product. So a UL 62 product is not the same as a UL 817, which is essentially what i am arguing.

                              To answer your question, a power cord can only be a flexible cord if it is listed under UL 62.

                              Comment

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