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Wet Bathroom and Receptacles/lighting question

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    Wet Bathroom and Receptacles/lighting question

    I'm having trouble uploading the plan image that shows what I am referencing. I have a "wet bathroom" being proposed in an accessory dwelling unit. Basically, the entire area is a shower with a toilet and vanity. The entire room area is 6'x6'. The shower is on one side and the toilet and vanity are on the other side. My question is seeing if a receptacle would be required adjacent to the vanity since the area is a similar to a "shower enclosure." Or can it be installed along with the switches/lighting so long as it is listed as wet location? Thoughts?

    thanks!

    #2
    Code requires receptacle within 3' of rim of sink.
    Master Electrician
    Electrical Contractor
    Richmond, VA

    Comment


      #3
      It might not be that simple. For starters, what do you mean by "accessory dwelling unit"? That phrase is not defined in article 100. Does it already exist, or is it being planned? Is it associated with an existing house (i.e., the "dwelling unit" to which it is an "accessory")? Is it detached completely - no common walls with the existing house?

      If this "thing" is completely separate from the house, and if (as you described) it has no sleeping or cooking or living accommodations, then this "thing" is not a "dwelling unit" on its own right. That tells me that the rules for dwelling units, including the rule about receptacles near bathroom sinks, will not apply.
      Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
      Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

      Comment


        #4
        We have run across this and there isn't a good answer. It is an authority having jurisdiction call. I believe the receptacle will be just fine near the vanity
        They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
        She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
        I can't help it if I'm lucky

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
          We have run across this and there isn't a good answer . . . . I believe the receptacle will be just fine near the vanity
          What have we run across before? How to make a receptacle work in such a location, or whether a receptacle is required at all? I would like some clarification from the OP about the nature of this "accessory dwelling unit."

          Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
          Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

          Comment


            #6
            "We" meaning my company... Basically the entire room is tiled with a drain to one side for the shower-- no lip for the shower and no walls. It is easy to see, IMO, the distinction between the shower area and the sink so the receptacle by the vanity is not an issue.. Water should be contained on one side. Without a drawing I am just guessing
            They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
            She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
            I can't help it if I'm lucky

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
              Water should be contained on one side.
              No kids throwing cups of water around? Aiming shower head (or hand-held shower-on-a-hose) in the wrong direction? Definitely a place for GFCI/AFCI/AFLCIO!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by PaulMmn View Post
                Definitely a place for GFCI/AFCI/AFLCIO!
                You left off LSMFT!

                Yes a receptacle could be safely installed and operated in the location described. I am still waiting on answers to the questions that could determine whether a receptacle is required to be installed at all.

                Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
                Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

                Comment


                  #9
                  You also need a dry spot to hang the towels! And the drawers in the vanity need to have drain holes, plastic liners, and maybe gaskets around the opening.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Sounds like a shower/toilet room in a pool house.

                    Just give them a big old in-use whether proof cover on a GFCI receptacle.

                    -Hal

                    Comment


                      #11
                      GFci breaker.
                      Soap on a rope!

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Click image for larger version

Name:	shower enclosure.jpg
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Size:	22.2 KB
ID:	2380950
                        Originally posted by charlie b View Post
                        It might not be that simple. For starters, what do you mean by "accessory dwelling unit"? That phrase is not defined in article 100. Does it already exist, or is it being planned? Is it associated with an existing house (i.e., the "dwelling unit" to which it is an "accessory")? Is it detached completely - no common walls with the existing house?

                        If this "thing" is completely separate from the house, and if (as you described) it has no sleeping or cooking or living accommodations, then this "thing" is not a "dwelling unit" on its own right. That tells me that the rules for dwelling units, including the rule about receptacles near bathroom sinks, will not apply.
                        Ok I was able to add a photo of the plan. This is an accessory dwelling unit defined by CA State law. Basically has a kitchen, bathroom, living room, bedroom that is secondary to the main dwelling unit (all under the same roof). I would think a receptacle is required, but would like some feedback.

                        thanks!

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by TrickleCharge View Post
                          I would think a receptacle is required, but would like some feedback.
                          I agree that an accessory dwelling unit (ADU) bathroom is, simply, a dwelling bathroom. My local area, Minneapolis, is winding up a long process of changing local ordinance to allow an ADU on a, formerly, single family dwelling property. If the property meets the ordinance, the ADU gets wired as a single family dwelling per the NEC, here in Minneapolis. Upon final inspections all passing a certificate of occupancy is issued for the ADU.

                          In my opinion, the bath sink receptacle outlet is required.
                          Another Al in Minnesota

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Thanks for the clarification. This is what settles the question in my mind:
                            Originally posted by TrickleCharge View Post
                            . . . (all under the same roof).
                            The notion of an ADU is not relevant. You have a dwelling unit, and here is a bathroom in that dwelling unit. I agree with Al, and with Larry's post #2.

                            Charles E. Beck, P.E., Seattle
                            Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              And the note reads that all receptacles, switches... in wet bath shall be listed for wet location.

                              So now with that out of the way, how do you do this without looking butt ugly in a bathroom?

                              I love designers and architects that come up with these things with no idea how to do it.
                              I would send them an RFI for recommended devices.

                              -Hal

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