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Replacing ground rod due to equipment relocation. Removal of old grounding rods?

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    #16
    Most rods can be removed with a moderate-size pipe wrench and a bottle jack (or a 4x4 and a 6' steel bar). It just takes a little time.

    (or a chain and forklift will do it, too)

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      #17
      Originally posted by electrofelon View Post
      Also what exactly is this equipment and is this in a structure? Rods at equipment, despite being a common MFG spec, probably increase risks.
      COM equipment + housing

      Plus isn't' a bad thing for leaving rods or abandoned cables or equipment in ground ?

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        #18
        Originally posted by thewire View Post

        Plus isn't' a bad thing for leaving rods or abandoned cables or equipment in ground ?
        Generaly speaking, not really.

        Roger
        Moderator

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          #19
          I didn't understand how it worked, but we had 2 utility poled within a few feet of each other behind our house; one was abandoned. My wife hated the look and after about 2 years of calling, a utility truck with some sort of boom came and pulled it, filling the (I'd guess over 6 foot) hole with gravel, then a bag of topsoil on top. VERY professional.

          However this worked ... ??? should be able to pull a ground rod.

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            #20
            Originally posted by infinity View Post
            As Roger pointed out they're technically still present and must be used, that is unless you cut off an inch or two.
            And if it's a 10' rod?

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              #21
              Originally posted by 480sparky View Post
              And if it's a 10' rod?
              I'll cut an inch off and you can try and prove that it's 9'11".
              Rob

              Moderator

              All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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                #22
                Originally posted by infinity View Post
                I'll cut an inch off and you can try and prove that it's 9'11".
                I'm sure there would be an inspector that would require you to prove it's 7'11".

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by 480sparky View Post
                  I'm sure there would be an inspector that would require you to prove it's 7'11".


                  Just as an aside has anyone seen a 10' ground rod that was 5/8"? The only ones that I've ever seen that are 10' long are 3/4".
                  Rob

                  Moderator

                  All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by GeorgeB View Post
                    I didn't understand how it worked, but we had 2 utility poled within a few feet of each other behind our house; one was abandoned. My wife hated the look and after about 2 years of calling, a utility truck with some sort of boom came and pulled it, filling the (I'd guess over 6 foot) hole with gravel, then a bag of topsoil on top. VERY professional.

                    However this worked ... ??? should be able to pull a ground rod.
                    That's just the same rig that they set poles with. It has an auger and a "claw" that they use to pick the pole up and drop it in the hole. There is also a winch on the boom that they use to lift poles off the trailer and pull old poles. Usually they have to wiggle it back and forth with the claw to loosen it up then wrap a chain around it, attach the winch cable and out it comes.

                    Bit of an overkill for a ground rod.

                    -Hal

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                      #25
                      I would argue that connecting it to a grounding electrode system is what makes it a ground rod. Otherwise it's just a piece of metal stuck in the ground.

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                        #26


                        -Hal

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by ggunn View Post
                          I would argue that connecting it to a grounding electrode system is what makes it a ground rod. Otherwise it's just a piece of metal stuck in the ground.
                          You could say the same thing about the rebar in the footing. IMO either way they're both present.
                          Rob

                          Moderator

                          All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by GeorgeB View Post
                            I didn't understand how it worked, but we had 2 utility poled within a few feet of each other behind our house; one was abandoned. My wife hated the look and after about 2 years of calling, a utility truck with some sort of boom came and pulled it, filling the (I'd guess over 6 foot) hole with gravel, then a bag of topsoil on top. VERY professional.

                            However this worked ... ??? should be able to pull a ground rod.
                            My guess on the reason for two poles within a few feet of one another (something I have seen several times anyway) is POCO replaces pole, sets new one just a few feet away from original and transfers their equipment to the new pole. Below there may be communications lines or other equipment operated by others, so they cut of top of old pole so it is out of way for their lines near the top but leave that other stuff for operators of that equipment to transfer to the new pole sometime later. Then the old pole sits there for years sometimes with nothing attached to it unless someone complains enough to get it removed.
                            I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by infinity View Post
                              You could say the same thing about the rebar in the footing. IMO either way they're both present.
                              Present where? How close does an abandoned piece of metal that used to be a ground rod need to be to a service to necessitate its bonding to the GES? 6 feet? 20 feet ? 1/4 mile?

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                                #30
                                Originally posted by ggunn View Post
                                Present where? How close does an abandoned piece of metal that used to be a ground rod need to be to a service to necessitate its bonding to the GES? 6 feet? 20 feet ? 1/4 mile?
                                Good question that no one can answer and they changed to code wording a few cycles back to the word present to make it clearer.
                                Rob

                                Moderator

                                All responses based on the 2014 NEC unless otherwise noted

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