Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dwelling Outlet Placement

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Dwelling Outlet Placement

    I am roughing in area that is considered " living area in a dwelling " which must comply with the 6 ft then 12 ft spacing for outlet placement. Two 3 ft long walls were added perpendicular to one outside wall to enclose an area with a water supply and a floor drain for " dog washing ". The walls are only 4 ft high. with the addition of these wall are they counted as wall space for outlet placement.

    #2
    IMO yes. Same thing would apply to a knee wall that was used to separate two spaces.
    Rob

    Moderator

    All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

    Comment


      #3
      I would say yes due to having a similar experience. However, if you have receptacle(s) on the outside wall that would fit within the 6' rule you wouldn't need to add any. Example: a receptacle within 3' of the new corner would give you the 6' if you count the 3' for the new wall.

      Edit, the fact that it has a drain and would be a wash area, the space might not be "livable", but an inspector might see it otherwise and require GFCI protection.
      [COLOR=navy]If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time![/COLOR]

      Comment


        #4
        If it were my call, I'd say receptacles only on the dry side of the short walls, and none in the wet area.
        Master Electrician
        Electrical Contractor
        Richmond, VA

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by LarryFine View Post
          If it were my call, I'd say receptacles only on the dry side of the short walls, and none in the wet area.
          There you go apply common sense to the installation. IMO the NEC hasn't caught up to adding common sense in a dog washing area and the wall space in that area would still count.
          Rob

          Moderator

          All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

          Comment


            #6
            Okay, one more question: How far apart are the two walls? If less than 6', my scenario would be compliant.
            Master Electrician
            Electrical Contractor
            Richmond, VA

            Comment


              #7
              And 100% I would have GFCI protection on the receps that served the dog wash area.

              Comment


                #8
                Thanks to all who responded. My area has adopted the 2017 NEC so I will be using combo arc Fault/GFCI circuit breakers to feed this circuit. To clarify my original post please see the attached picture. The two knee walls were added after I roughed in the outer wall creating more than 6 ft to the first outlet.
                Attached Files

                Comment


                  #9
                  We can all give you our opinions, and have, but your best bet would be to call the inspector and explain to him or buy a consult permit and let him come look. He might have mercy on you.
                  But to be honest, it wouldn't be that hard to add receptacles. Be kind of silly to require any on the wet side of the wall, but who knows what an inspector might want.
                  [COLOR=navy]If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time![/COLOR]

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by paulcoulston View Post
                    Thanks to all who responded. My area has adopted the 2017 NEC so I will be using combo arc Fault/GFCI circuit breakers to feed this circuit. To clarify my original post please see the attached picture. The two knee walls were added after I roughed in the outer wall creating more than 6 ft to the first outlet.
                    I see this no different than a permanent cabinet for say a wet bar, dining room buffet, entertainment center, etc. The floor line is interrupted by something other than ordinary wall, need a receptacle within 6 feet both directions from this object as the 6-12 rule starts over at each side. Side of this object may in some cases be considered ordinary wall.

                    You could build the same thing all the way to ceiling and put a door on it and it doesn't really change the required outlets, closets are built like that quite often and outlet spacing requirements starts over at each side of the door.

                    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I would just add a receptacle in the middle of the right knee wall probably on the left side of the center stud and call it a day. Shouldn't take more than 5 minutes- pull the wire back, add a new length.

                      Looks like the one on the left is ok as is.

                      -Hal

                      Comment


                        #12
                        What Hal said.
                        Master Electrician
                        Electrical Contractor
                        Richmond, VA

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by infinity View Post

                          There you go apply common sense to the installation. IMO the NEC hasn't caught up to adding common sense in a dog washing area and the wall space in that area would still count.
                          547? ...considering one's dog 'livestock'......?

                          Click image for larger version

Name:	article-2488157-1937A43900000578-404_634x733.jpg
Views:	188
Size:	97.2 KB
ID:	2531757
                          ~RJ~


                          Comment


                            #14
                            I don’t know the exception but I have worked on many custom residences with well over 12’ of walls inside the shower. I’m sure your application would fall under that exception.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by five.five-six View Post
                              I don’t know the exception but I have worked on many custom residences with well over 12’ of walls inside the shower. I’m sure your application would fall under that exception.
                              The shower is a space that doesn't require receptacles, your 6-12 rule starts over on each side of the opening to the shower.
                              I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X