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    225 amp service

    Anyone done one with a regular "200 amp" socket? It appears some/many are rated "200 amps continuous, 240 amp maximum". I never noticed this until recently as I have a house with a bunch of electric heat and I don't want to go up to the expense of a 320 socket, and 200 is borderline. The way I see it, there is no requirement that a meter socket be protected at it's rating, so in fact I could go with any size service disconnect as long as the socket rating meets the load calc.
    Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

    "You can't generalize"

    #2
    I don't. I base the size of the meterbase off of the size of the OCPD. If it's a 225a OCPD then its a 320a Meterbase for me. JAP>

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by electrofelon View Post
      Anyone done one with a regular "200 amp" socket? It appears some/many are rated "200 amps continuous, 240 amp maximum". I never noticed this until recently as I have a house with a bunch of electric heat and I don't want to go up to the expense of a 320 socket, and 200 is borderline. The way I see it, there is no requirement that a meter socket be protected at it's rating, so in fact I could go with any size service disconnect as long as the socket rating meets the load calc.
      Can't recall ever installing a 225 amp service, but I agree with you that there is no requirement to protect it at it's rating, in fact you could have six mains that add up to over 200 amps, probably still good idea to have load calculation of 200 or less though.

      If you have borderline load calculation and opt for smallest thing that will work you have no room for future additions is something to consider and main reason I probably still would go with 325 socket and likely two 200 amp panels.

      I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

      Comment


        #4
        Here is something from Schneider electric that may help.

        “Typically a 200A Individual Meter Socket is rated 200A CONTINUOUS and is suitable for use with 80% Rated Main Breaker Load Centers Rated 250A maximum. Square D does not make a standard 80% Rated 250A Main Breaker Load Center, but does offer 80% Rated 225A Main Breaker Load Centers having a total connected load restricted to 180A that is less than 200A continuous rating listed above.
        Other common Individual Meter Socket frame sizes include:
        100A continuous = 125A Max Main Breaker Load Center that is rated for a total connected load of 80% [125A x 0.80 = 100A].
        200A continuous = 250A Max Main Breaker Load Center that is rated for a total connected load of 80% [250A x 0.80 = 200A].
        320A continuous = 400A Max Main Breaker Load Center that is rated for a total connected load of 80% [400A x 0.80 = 320A].
        400A continuous = 500A Max Main Breaker Load Center that is rated for a total connected load of 80% [500A x 0.80 = 400A].”

        Comment


          #5
          You could always ask the POCO (which provides meter bases free here).
          Master Electrician
          Electrical Contractor
          Richmond, VA

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by jap View Post
            I don't. I base the size of the meterbase off of the size of the OCPD. If it's a 225a OCPD then its a 320a Meterbase for me. JAP>
            So you never use the next size up rule or 2-6 rule??
            Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

            "You can't generalize"

            Comment


              #7
              Not for that.

              JAP>

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jap View Post
                I don't. I base the size of the meterbase off of the size of the OCPD. If it's a 225a OCPD then its a 320a Meterbase for me. JAP>
                Note there are two points of discussion here.

                1. Using a meter base's non-continuous rating, which many don't notice is higher than the continuous.

                2. Having an OCPD higher than even the meter bases non continuous rating.

                Do you subscribe to 1 but not 2 or neither?
                Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

                "You can't generalize"

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by kwired View Post

                  If you have borderline load calculation and opt for smallest thing that will work you have no room for future additions is something to consider and main reason I probably still would go with 325 socket and likely two 200 amp panels.
                  200 is borderline, 225 makes it not borderline, no need to apply the borderline clause twice
                  Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

                  "You can't generalize"

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by electrofelon View Post

                    Note there are two points of discussion here.

                    1. Using a meter base's non-continuous rating, which many don't notice is higher than the continuous.

                    2. Having an OCPD higher than even the meter bases non continuous rating.

                    Do you subscribe to 1 but not 2 or neither?
                    I don't think about it that much.

                    If I didn't have a single main OCPD, I'd have no choice but to rely on my calculated load to size the meterbase.
                    If that load was under the specifications of the meterbase rating, I'd be fine with it and go on.

                    If it does have a single main OCPD then:

                    If I have an "Up to" 200a Main OCPD I use a 200 amp meterbase.
                    If I have more than a 200 amp Main OCPD "Up to" 320, I use a 320 amp meterbase.
                    If I have more than a 320a Main OCPD up to 400 amp I use a 320 amp meterbase because it's allowed in my area.
                    If I have a 600 amp OCPD with a load of 320 or less I sometimes use a 320 amp self contained meterbase for one power company (because that's what the power company requires around here because their CT's are inaccurate at minimum loads I was told)
                    If I have a larger than 600 amp service it's most always CT's instead of self contained.

                    But that's just me.

                    JAP>

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by jap View Post

                      I don't think about it that much.

                      If I didn't have a single main OCPD, I'd have no choice but to rely on my calculated load to size the meterbase.
                      If that load was under the specifications of the meterbase rating, I'd be fine with it and go on.

                      If it does have a single main OCPD then:

                      If I have an "Up to" 200a Main OCPD I use a 200 amp meterbase.
                      If I have more than a 200 amp Main OCPD "Up to" 320, I use a 320 amp meterbase.
                      If I have more than a 320a Main OCPD up to 400 amp I use a 320 amp meterbase because it's allowed in my area.
                      If I have a 600 amp OCPD with a load of 320 or less I sometimes use a 320 amp self contained meterbase for one power company (because that's what the power company requires around here because their CT's are inaccurate at minimum loads I was told)
                      If I have a larger than 600 amp service it's most always CT's instead of self contained.

                      But that's just me.

                      JAP>
                      Your logic is not very consistent
                      Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

                      "You can't generalize"

                      Comment


                        #12
                        What do you mean by that?

                        JAP>

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by jap View Post
                          What do you mean by that?

                          JAP>
                          You are not willing to use a 200/240 amp meter socket at above even it's continuous rating, but will use a 320/400 with the OCPD even above it's non continuous rating.
                          Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

                          "You can't generalize"

                          Comment


                            #14
                            That's correct.

                            Reason being is because one of the choices is one I would be responsible for and the other would be one that the power company would be responsible for.

                            JAP>

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Point being, if you're worried about the use yourself, the difference in cost between a 200 amp meter base and a 320 would be well worth the extra expense to ease your mind in the long run.

                              JAP>

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