Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

225 amp service

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Before you go thru this check out the difference in price for 2-200 amp panel and a 320 amp base vs 1- 225 amp panel.. If it is that close then go to 400 amp.....
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
      Before you go thru this check out the difference in price for 2-200 amp panel and a 320 amp base vs 1- 225 amp panel.. If it is that close then go to 400 amp.....
      Yeah its a lot more for the 2-200. A 225 is basically the same cost as the 200, other than larger wire which I would be going with larger for VD anyway as this is about 300 feet. Just the class 320 socket alone is $350 more by the time you add lugs.
      Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

      "You can't generalize"

      Comment


        #18
        We're so lucky Dominion Power distributes meter bases free!
        Master Electrician
        Electrical Contractor
        Richmond, VA

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by electrofelon View Post
          Anyone done one with a regular "200 amp" socket? It appears some/many are rated "200 amps continuous, 240 amp maximum". I never noticed this until recently as I have a house with a bunch of electric heat and I don't want to go up to the expense of a 320 socket, and 200 is borderline. The way I see it, there is no requirement that a meter socket be protected at it's rating, so in fact I could go with any size service disconnect as long as the socket rating meets the load calc.
          A 200A panel is borderline?

          How much running load, real world, would you estimate you'll actually have on the service?

          If I felt comfortable it would be well under 200A continuous, I might use a 225A panel with a 200A meterbase, possibly, maybe. I'd sure lean towards a 320 though, just because I like cushion ...but sometimes customer budgets are tighter than what my preferences want to use.

          On a sidenote, I used the free excel load calc on this site for a 100 amp service change we did a couple weeks ago. The existing panel just didn't have enough space. The inspector saw a couple of circuits were added also and thought we needed a 200A service, so he asked for a load calc.

          I ran it through the excel calculator and came up with 137 amps. Which made us all poop our pants since we just installed a replacement 100 amp service!!

          We called the power co. and asked for peak demand over the last 12 mos. instead. 62 amps. (Huge sigh of relief!!! And a passed inspection!!)

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by Cow View Post

            A 200A panel is borderline?

            How much running load, real world, would you estimate you'll actually have on the service?

            If I felt comfortable it would be well under 200A continuous, I might use a 225A panel with a 200A meterbase, possibly, maybe. I'd sure lean towards a 320 though, just because I like cushion ...but sometimes customer budgets are tighter than what my preferences want to use.

            On a sidenote, I used the free excel load calc on this site for a 100 amp service change we did a couple weeks ago. The existing panel just didn't have enough space. The inspector saw a couple of circuits were added also and thought we needed a 200A service, so he asked for a load calc.

            I ran it through the excel calculator and came up with 137 amps. Which made us all poop our pants since we just installed a replacement 100 amp service!!

            We called the power co. and asked for peak demand over the last 12 mos. instead. 62 amps. (Huge sigh of relief!!! And a passed inspection!!)
            Its a basic small/medium all electric house plus 18KW of electric heat. I put it real world as never getting above 140A. Really 200 would be fine, but 225 makes it closer to or maybe nec compliant (things are lax here, not in a million years will I be asked for a calc). Utility will be supplying 25KVA transformer. I just hate "400 amp" services on dwellings. Totally un-necessary.
            Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

            "You can't generalize"

            Comment


              #21
              Anyone know: Do all class 200 sockets have the 200 C/240NC rating? It seems some do and some dont, but that is just from what I gleam looking online and I doubt the accuracy of some of these specs. Saw one that said "250 amp non continuous"
              Ethan Brush - East West Electric. NY, WA. MA

              "You can't generalize"

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by LarryFine View Post
                We're so lucky Dominion Power distributes meter bases free!
                You are paying for them, just not directly.
                I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by kwired View Post

                  You are paying for them, just not directly.
                  Agree. The end user always foots the bill for “free” items.
                  we use to “give” them away with our name stamped on them on the cover. Electricians were getting them and installing them on another system and charging for them.
                  We stopped giving them away some time back

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by electrofelon View Post

                    Its a basic small/medium all electric house plus 18KW of electric heat. I put it real world as never getting above 140A. Really 200 would be fine, but 225 makes it closer to or maybe nec compliant (things are lax here, not in a million years will I be asked for a calc). Utility will be supplying 25KVA transformer. I just hate "400 amp" services on dwellings. Totally un-necessary.
                    General rule I have sort of come up with is if heat is under 20kW you seldom need more than 200 amps on a typical dwelling.

                    I have a couple larger homes I have done that were all electric and even 320 metering wasn't going to cut it with them, both were served by individual transformer and CT metering was done at the transformer. One had three sets of conductors supplying three 200 amp mains other had four each. Both could have had lesser supply conductors and taps to each main, but was simpler and cost less to do it like I did.

                    Sounds like I wouldn't be able to do either one that way with 2020 NEC though
                    I live for today, I'm just a day behind.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by Hv&Lv View Post
                      Here is something from Schneider electric that may help.

                      “Typically a 200A Individual Meter Socket is rated 200A CONTINUOUS and is suitable for use with 80% Rated Main Breaker Load Centers Rated 250A maximum. Square D does not make a standard 80% Rated 250A Main Breaker Load Center, but does offer 80% Rated 225A Main Breaker Load Centers having a total connected load restricted to 180A that is less than 200A continuous rating listed above.
                      Other common Individual Meter Socket frame sizes include:
                      100A continuous = 125A Max Main Breaker Load Center that is rated for a total connected load of 80% [125A x 0.80 = 100A].
                      200A continuous = 250A Max Main Breaker Load Center that is rated for a total connected load of 80% [250A x 0.80 = 200A].
                      320A continuous = 400A Max Main Breaker Load Center that is rated for a total connected load of 80% [400A x 0.80 = 320A].
                      400A continuous = 500A Max Main Breaker Load Center that is rated for a total connected load of 80% [500A x 0.80 = 400A].”
                      That is interesting, the only time I have seen that is on a gas-station / mini mart (on single phase) they specified a 225A single phase loadcenter with a 200A continuous / 250A non meter socket, it was approved by the AHJ. I imagine it was a boilerplate design that that company used on all of the single phase ones. I have never seen that done on residential but it seems like a fine idea, especially now that we see so much solar and other stuff like cars going electric.
                      Comments based on 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted.

                      Comment

                      Working...
                      X