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    Swimming pool bonding

    2014 NEC swimming pool bonding 680.26(B)(6)(a)

    First off, I have not done a pool inspection since The Twin Towers went down, so I am trying to knock the rust off.
    Not sure what I am missing here, but here is the way I am understanding this section.

    The second sentence – (the very first sentence under this section simply states “Double-Insulated Water Pump Motors.”) The second sentence is self-explanatory, I believe. I understand it to mean if the pool motor is double insulated and installed correctly, then you simply run a solid # 8 conductor with enough extra length to reach the pump motor. But you do not connect it, you simply leave it there for future use in case a replacement pump motor which is not double insulated is installed, then this conductor should be connected to the replacement motor to equalize the potential voltage with the other bonded grid components of the pool.

    The next sentence, as I understand it, states if there is no other connection between the bonding grid and the equipment system for the premises, then you take this same #8 solid conductor and now connect it to the EGC of the motor circuit.
    Two things bother me is this scenario – 680.21(B) – by way of 680.21.(A) – states the EGC shall be minimum size #12. Cheaper pool pump motors often have #14 conductors in their attached cords. (At least by my research via the internet).
    Let’s say the initial motor is double-insulated, and the #8 bonding conductor is therefore connected to the EGC of the motor circuit. Now the motor is replaced for some reason, and the replacement is not a double insulated motor. My concern is the replacement motor may not have a bonding lug on it, so it may not get attached.

    I know the code is a living thing, constantly evolving and chasing technology. I also know the code could not possibly address future scenarios.
    I am just reaching out to others to see if I am missing anything on this subject prior to an upcoming pool inspection.

    Thanks in advance for your help. And I always want to thank Mike Holt for his monetary commitment to founding this website and to the moderators for their time commitment to ensuring the professionalism of our trade is maintained. This trade has provided me and my family with a good living, and provided me with a sense of pride in my chosen profession.
    " One of my reasons for success: I learned to feel comfortable being uncomfortable." -- Cal Ripken, Jr.

    #2
    You have read the section correctly however I would not worry about pumps not having a lug. I have never seen a pool pump without the bonding lug. In fact, I have heard of double insulated pumps coming with bonding lugs. When they called the company about it they said inspectors and electricians were complaining that there wasn't a lug so they put one on it.

    BTW, you can't inspect for what someone might do later. You can only inspect what you see now.
    They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
    She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
    I can't help it if I'm lucky

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Dennis Alwon View Post
      You have read the section correctly however I would not worry about pumps not having a lug. I have never seen a pool pump without the bonding lug. In fact, I have heard of double insulated pumps coming with bonding lugs. When they called the company about it they said inspectors and electricians were complaining that there wasn't a lug so they put one on it.

      BTW, you can't inspect for what someone might do later. You can only inspect what you see now.
      Thank you for the quick reply. I understand I only inspect for what i see now.. That is what I was attempting to say when I stated "the code could not possibly address future scenarios." You stated it much better.

      As a 20+ year active member of the International Association of Electrical Inspectors (IAEI) who came up through our trade, I have never hesitated to reach out when I was not positive concerning the code and interpretations of it. The goal for our trade always remains the same - to get it right. That is why I am researching on Sunday - and also you were kind enough to respond on a Sunday. .

      Gratefully,
      " One of my reasons for success: I learned to feel comfortable being uncomfortable." -- Cal Ripken, Jr.

      Comment


        #4
        I truly respect someone who is willing to admit they may not be up on something rather than someone who is thick headed and unwilling to learn. I have learned from inspectors and they have learned from me. That, IMO is how it should be... Thank you for your willingness to go the extra mile to give a good inspection.
        They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
        She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
        I can't help it if I'm lucky

        Comment


          #5
          Of all the pools I have done, I have never ran across a double insulated motor. I have always wondered how you would connect a jumper from the grid to the EGC of the circuit should the pump motor be the only thing that would connect the grid to the system grounding. Where would you connect it? Probably not a pool panel there with only one piece of equipment.
          [COLOR=navy]If you aim at nothing, you will hit it every time![/COLOR]

          Comment


            #6
            You would have to make the switch box for the pump large enough to accommodate the #8 bonding wire.
            They say I shot a man named Gray and took his wife to Italy
            She inherited a million bucks and when she died it came to me
            I can't help it if I'm lucky

            Comment

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