Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ground Prong up?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Ground Prong up?

    In the latest issue of NEC Digest, readers letters, it was stated that
    OSHA requires receptacles to be installed with the ground prong up
    if installed within 4' of the floor. Is this true? I have never heard of this.

    #2
    Normally we would close a 'up or down ground' thread but this one is different.

    Please try to stick to the OSHA question...

    Comment


      #3
      I've never heard of it and wonder why a receptacle above 4' is any different than one below 4'.
      Rob

      Moderator

      All responses based on the 2017 NEC unless otherwise noted

      Comment


        #4
        Isn't osha about job safety and not final product ???????
        member of the Christine car club

        Comment


          #5
          Jim, I would think that if this is in fact an OSHA regulation they will have some safety reason for their substantiation but, like Trevor, I've never heard this before.

          Roger
          Moderator

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by roger
            Jim, I would think that if this is in fact an OSHA regulation they will have some safety reason for their substantiation but, like Trevor, I've never heard this before.

            Roger
            Is there job not over after final ? I also question if they ever said it.
            member of the Christine car club

            Comment


              #7
              Jim, in a commercial or industrial setting OSHA can visit and cite violations anytime, even years after a C.O., they play little or no part in finals or C. O.'s and can show up when they please.

              Roger
              Moderator

              Comment


                #8
                I've been searching for 30 mins. and can't find this. Where are the link masters tonight? (or mabey it DOESN'T exist). Sorry, was I shouting there?

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by chris kennedy
                  I've been searching for 30 mins. and can't find this. Where are the link masters tonight? (or mabey it DOESN'T exist). Sorry, was I shouting there?
                  I think the magazine writer may have had bad information. I ran the following two Google searches, and the only results were for missing ground prongs:

                  "ground prong" site:www.osha.gov

                  "ground pin" site:www.osha.gov

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I was under the (more than likely mistaken) assumption that OSHA referenced the NEC for its electrical rules?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by peter d
                      I was under the (more than likely mistaken) assumption that OSHA referenced the NEC for its electrical rules?
                      I thought it was NFPA 70E? :confused:
                      John from Baltimore "One Day at a Time"

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I think this only applies to installations in paper clip factories because if a cord were not inserted all the way a paper clip could fall across the hot and neutral and cause a short.......Now if the ground were up this would not happen.


                        Seriously though would a requirement like this over rule an NEC requirement and if so where would they draw the line. It seems as though we code have competeing codes is somebody wanted to go that route. Not a good thing imo.
                        [COLOR="Navy"]There are two kinds of people - those smart enough to know they donít know, and those dumb enough to insist they do[/COLOR].-----Margery Eagan

                        [COLOR="DarkRed"]Open shop since 1988[/COLOR]

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by electricmanscott
                          I think this only applies to installations in paper clip factories because if a cord were not inserted all the way a paper clip could fall across the hot and neutral and cause a short.......Now if the ground were up this would not happen.
                          Count Metal Receptacle Cover Testing Facilities in this list, too. :grin:

                          Comment


                            #14
                            OSHA can use any recognized standard to cite violations under the general duty clause. The have used both NFPA 70 and 70E.
                            Don, Illinois
                            (All code citations are 2017 unless otherwise noted)

                            Comment


                              #15
                              The only Ground up I can think of is for right angle plugs like for Dryers and ranges or equipment in commercial kitchens for strain releaf.
                              Unlimited Electric Contractor/Standard Electric Inspector/Traffic Signal Inspector/Highway Lighting and Level One Traffic Signal Installer.

                              I know you believe that you understand what you think I said but I'm sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X