Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

My first install, questions thread.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    Originally posted by jaggedben View Post
    There's not really a better way. Turbo blade works better than a straight cutter. You might look at the the Ironridge tile replacement flashing, I've given them some thought but they're much more expensive than the hooks I'm using.

    yes, I think they are about $12 each from greentech so, depending on how much time they save it may be worth it. Quick hook has a free samples form on their webpage, I ordered about one of each. I’ll post if I like them.

    The diamond blade I have been using has been on my die grinder for about 7 years, which is about when I lost the removal tool LOL. I’ve done a bunch of semiflush resi stucco service change outs with it. It’s seen better days. I picked up a Makita blade from HD because it seemed to have the widest diamond embedded section of all their offerings. I end up using it more like a disk sander than a cutting wheel.

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by five.five-six View Post
      Not exactly free but last time I went to the scrap yard, there was a Berg electric apprentice in a Nisan Sentra using a hacksall to cut the ends off about 50 new spools of #10 he was told to scrap. I bought 10 rolls off him for $100 and he got out of taking them off the spool.



      So, how are you guys that do tile notching the tiles? I picked up a m18 angle grinder and put a diamond blade on it. It works better than an abrasive disk but there has to be a better way.
      My preferred method is a hammer. With proper technique you can usually remove enough material by channeling your inner stone mason, with practice wont break tile, and it's pretty fast/light on the roof... this avoids the recreation of the ashes scene from the Big Lebowski, and controls silica dust much more effectively than a grinder. The grinder is great for precision and would be my preferred method in a perfect world, but if your doing this on a regular basis anything short of spraying water to control dust is going to put your guys in a Silica dust situation you may not want OSHA privy too. Hammer isn't perfect, but I feel better about asking my staff to do it than grinding. Being in Norcal and working in a specific demographic we work on the same tile homes all the time, and are picky about the projects we take on, so if your in the for profit world obviously your mileage may vary if your seeing a bunch of different types of tile.

      We are making the switch full time to tile replacements. Honestly I hate them... I've used Quickmount's replacements and they're flimsy garbage. Our program works with lots of volunteers, and it's damn near impossible from keeping an inexperienced person from stepping on them, or any tile they're adjacent too and bending them all up. SnapNRacks tile replacements have so far been vaporware. I've heard mixed reviews of Pegasus, but it's another possibility I guess. I've never used iron ridge, but I imagine they're pretty similar to the others. It's just not much fun hauling 300+lbs of tile off a 2 story roof when it's 120+ up there. Most of our homeowners don't want 20+ replacement tiles, and it's not like I can just throw them in the garbage dumpster at work. 20 tile thrown in here and there isn't a huge deal, but if I'm building 5-6 jobs a week that adds up to a lot of concrete disposed improperly.

      No solution is perfect that I've seen. I'm definitely up for suggestions though!
      Last edited by Whalepod; 07-06-19, 02:15 AM.

      Comment


        #18
        @Whalepod

        Ironridge's approach doesn't require precise vertical location of the post, which I think would be a major advantage for saving time and avoiding mistakes and frustration.

        Thanks for the comments about customers. I was figuring that ending up with spare tile would be an advantage (i.e. if you break any you don't have to go to the boneyard). But I wasn't considering the flip-side. Probably depends on the job which is better on that score.

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by jaggedben View Post
          @Whalepod

          Ironridge's approach doesn't require precise vertical location of the post, which I think would be a major advantage for saving time and avoiding mistakes and frustration.

          Thanks for the comments about customers. I was figuring that ending up with spare tile would be an advantage (i.e. if you break any you don't have to go to the boneyard). But I wasn't considering the flip-side. Probably depends on the job which is better on that score.

          I’d think most customers would be thrilled to have a bunch of spare tiles at the end of the job with matching patina.

          Comment


            #20
            Forgot to mention this

            First day:
            I had about 20 or so tiles off and was laying out the rail supports and penetrations when all of a sudden I thought: “Gee, this section of the roof is awfully spongey. I’ve worked on spongey roofs before, most tilt ups are varying degrees of spongey but residential are most always rather rigid”

            And then a minute later, it wasn’t spongey anymore, nice and firm like I expected


            And then about an hour later, another portion of the roof felt spongey .... but just for about a minute and then it was firm again.

            Really strange.

            _________________

            Comment


              #21
              Does $95 seem like a reasonable price for an engraved placard and stickers set?

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by five.five-six View Post
                Does $95 seem like a reasonable price for an engraved placard and stickers set?
                If it includes a custom map placard that's reasonable perhaps. Not great.

                Comment


                  #23
                  How are you guys getting mods to the roof? I was thinking I’d rent a scissors lift but that seems rather expensive. Next thought was to buy one but then I have to store it.

                  Shingle hoist? Ropes?


                  I did read about someone putting them on a backpack but it seems that one good gust of wind and it would be curtains

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by five.five-six View Post
                    How are you guys getting mods to the roof? I was thinking I’d rent a scissors lift but that seems rather expensive. Next thought was to buy one but then I have to store it.

                    Shingle hoist? Ropes?


                    I did read about someone putting them on a backpack but it seems that one good gust of wind and it would be curtains
                    One story - one guy on the ground passing to 1-2 guys directly on the roof.

                    Two Story - find an intermediate roof and pass from the ground to the 1st story, then the 1st story to 2nd story

                    Two Story Cube home - if no intermediate roof lines are available I will go to home depot and buy some regular bent steel S style hooks that will pilot into the holes in the module for grounding lugs, then bend up some 8 or 6 bare copper into a tripod/coat hangar looking thing. two points on the bottom have the S hooks attached, and the top of the triangle is twisted into an eyelet that I can thread some high tensile strength rope, or some kind of mechanical clip into. The loose end of the rope stays on the roof and I use 1 or 2 staff members who stand at the head of the ladder that's already been setup and strapped to the rafter tail. drop your hook to the ground and hook it up to the module. Pull module up the ladder, preferably while you have another staff member climbing up the ladder behind the module to keep a hand on it while the roof guys pull it up.

                    Resi jobs (1-2 stories) I've never considered renting a scissor lift/gradall. Big resi jobs where we're humping any more than 30 mods (or a pallet of mods depending on the module manufacturer) I'll consider a gradall but probably wont pull the trigger because of the pace of our jobs. Multifamily/commercial I'll definitely run some kind of additional machinery. not only does it help with modules, but it's really helpful to be able to drop all equipment directly to the roof.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by Whalepod View Post
                      One story - one guy on the ground passing to 1-2 guys directly on the roof.

                      Two Story - find an intermediate roof and pass from the ground to the 1st story, then the 1st story to 2nd story

                      Two Story Cube home - if no intermediate roof lines are available I will go to home depot and buy some regular bent steel S style hooks that will pilot into the holes in the module for grounding lugs, then bend up some 8 or 6 bare copper into a tripod/coat hangar looking thing. two points on the bottom have the S hooks attached, and the top of the triangle is twisted into an eyelet that I can thread some high tensile strength rope, or some kind of mechanical clip into. The loose end of the rope stays on the roof and I use 1 or 2 staff members who stand at the head of the ladder that's already been setup and strapped to the rafter tail. drop your hook to the ground and hook it up to the module. Pull module up the ladder, preferably while you have another staff member climbing up the ladder behind the module to keep a hand on it while the roof guys pull it up.

                      Resi jobs (1-2 stories) I've never considered renting a scissor lift/gradall. Big resi jobs where we're humping any more than 30 mods (or a pallet of mods depending on the module manufacturer) I'll consider a gradall but probably wont pull the trigger because of the pace of our jobs. Multifamily/commercial I'll definitely run some kind of additional machinery. not only does it help with modules, but it's really helpful to be able to drop all equipment directly to the roof.
                      Thank you, great info!!!

                      it’s 26 modules so, not quite 30 but I’m regretting doing supports on 4’, with the tile roof, it’s a lot of work.

                      I’m to the point that I’m removing 2-3 courses of tiles at a time, laying out the supports and laying an entire course of 30# felt at a time. With 4’ supports, It’s probably less work than flashing up each individual support and it probably adds 30+ years to the sections of roof I am working, at least that’s my hope.


                      With the amount of labor involved in doing tile roofs, I’m either going to have to get a whole lot faster or I just don’t see how I can make any money at it.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        3’ from gas meter?

                        So, I have a buddy in my aquarium club who has been with the local natural gas company for many years. He told that the gas meter needs to be at least 3 linear feet from any electrical equipment such as an inverter and that they may require you to relocate one or the other if the meter is too close the inverter. He also told me that the rule has been relaxed to only require a 3’ circle around the meter. Has anyone else ran into this?


                        Also, my 9-year-old made this inverter “unboxing” video on youtube. Do me a favor and watch it in a separate browser so he gets “views” on it. It means the world to him at this age and he is really excited about the 77 views it already has. Like and or comment for bonus points. Thanks

                        https://youtu.be/i8tscM2yuEA

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by five.five-six View Post
                          That's $1,700 dollars, you drop it an I'll ... don't hurt yourself. Love it!!

                          Comment


                            #28
                            The 3ft rule for the gas meter is in the California Mechanical Code. Technically it is 3ft from the manifold vent (the vent on that flying saucer looking piece on the utility side of the gas meter). Sometimes the vent has a hose on it leading from inside to outside (in older more urban areas), in which case I think you can argue it's from the hose outlet and not the manifold. BUT I have learned not to count on winning those arguments with an inspector. Keep all your equipment at least 3ft from all the stuff mentioned to avoid issues.

                            If you are involving a utility in an electrical service upgrade there may be further restrictions.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by jaggedben View Post
                              If you are involving a utility in an electrical service upgrade there may be further restrictions.

                              Do tell!


                              The gas meter is right close to the service and it is being upgraded. The cold water entrance is the other side of the house sit 24’ vaulted ceilings but the gas meter is not 5’ away

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by oldsparky52 View Post
                                That's $1,700 dollars, you drop it an I'll ... don't hurt yourself. Love it!!

                                yea, I just love that kid... both my kids.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X